Coverart for item
The Resource Advances in bacterial respiratory physiology, edited by Robert K. Poole

Advances in bacterial respiratory physiology, edited by Robert K. Poole

Label
Advances in bacterial respiratory physiology
Title
Advances in bacterial respiratory physiology
Statement of responsibility
edited by Robert K. Poole
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Advances in Microbial Physiology is one of the most successful and prestigious series from Academic Press, an imprint of Elsevier. It publishes topical and important reviews, interpreting physiology to include all material that contributes to our understanding of how microorganisms and their component parts work. First published in 1967, it is now in its 61st volume. The Editors have always striven to interpret microbial physiology in the broadest context and have never restricted the contents to "traditional views of whole cell physiology. Now edited by Professor Robert Poole, University of Sheffield, Advances in Microbial Physiology continues to be an influential and very well reviewed series. Key features: * Contributions from leading authorities * Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field
Member of
Cataloging source
E7B
Dewey number
571.2/9
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QR89
LC item number
.A38 2012eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Poole, Robert K
Series statement
Advances in microbial physiology,
Series volume
v. 61
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Microbial respiration
  • Bacteria
  • Bacterial cell walls
  • SCIENCE
  • NATURE
  • Bacteria
  • Bacterial cell walls
  • Microbial respiration
Label
Advances in bacterial respiratory physiology, edited by Robert K. Poole
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Advances in Bacterial Respiratory Physiology; Copyright; Contents; Preface; References; Chapter One: Signal Correlations in Ecological Niches Can Shape the Organization and Evolution of Bacterial Gene Regulatory Networks; 1. Introduction; 2. Gene Expression Regulation as an Output of Signal Transduction Pathways; 2.1. Relative timescales of environmental fluctuations and biological responses; 2.2. Three main classes of protein transcription factors; 2.2.1. One-component transcriptional regulatory systems; 2.2.2. Two-component systems; 2.2.3. Alternative sigma factors
  • 2.3. Other regulatory systems2.4. Signal integration at the gene promoters; 3. Mapping Transcriptional Regulatory Networks; 3.1. Regulons and transcriptional regulatory networks; 3.2. Experimental characterization of regulons; 3.2.1. Global transcription profiling; 3.2.2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation for protein binding site localization; 3.3. Reverse engineering transcriptional regulatory networks; 3.4. Characterization of conserved regulatory networks using comparative genomics; 3.4.1. Homologues, orthologs, and paralogs; 3.4.2. Detecting conserved regulatory sequences
  • 3.4.3. Operon predictions4. Factors Shaping the Functional Composition of Regulons; 4.1. Signal integration; 4.2. Signal correlation; 4.3. The concept of core and extended regulons; 4.4. The dynamics of transcription factor binding sites; 4.5. Regulons evolve rapidly; 5. Evolution of Transcription Factor Functions; 5.1. The duplication and divergence model; 5.2. The role of lateral gene transfer; 5.3. Extended regulons may facilitate the evolution of new transcription factor functions; 6. Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter Two:Vibrio fischeri Metabolism: Symbiosis and Beyond
  • 1. Introduction2. V. fischeri as a Model Organism; 2.1. V. fischeri and bioluminescence; 2.2. V. fischeri and quorum sensing; 2.3. V. fischeri and symbiosis; 3. What are the Nutrient Sources for Symbiotic V. fischeri?; 3.1. Carbon sources; 3.2. Iron sources; 3.3. Summary; 4. Which V. fischeri Metabolic Pathways are Used in the Host?; 4.1. Aerobic respiration; 4.2. Anaerobic respiration; 4.3. Fermentation; 4.4. The acetate switch; 4.5. Summary; 5. What Regulatory Proteins are Controlling Expression of these Metabolic Pathways?; 5.1. Chitin utilization: NagC
  • 5.2. Heme utilization: Fur and H-NOX5.3. Anaerobic respiration: FNR; 5.4. Acetate metabolism: LitR; 5.5. Summary; 6. Which Pathways Might be Important in V. fischeris Free-Living Lifestyle?; 7. Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter Three:Environmental Heme Utilization by Heme-Auxotrophic Bacteria; 1. Introduction; 2. Biological Importance and Function of the Heme Molecule; 2.1. Heme function; 2.2. Heme synthesis; 3. HAB that Utilize Heme; 3.1. Inventory of HAB; 3.2. Lifestyle of the best-characterized HAB; 3.2.1. HAB with essential heme requirements
Control code
823654159
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 338 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780123978158
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)823654159
Label
Advances in bacterial respiratory physiology, edited by Robert K. Poole
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Advances in Bacterial Respiratory Physiology; Copyright; Contents; Preface; References; Chapter One: Signal Correlations in Ecological Niches Can Shape the Organization and Evolution of Bacterial Gene Regulatory Networks; 1. Introduction; 2. Gene Expression Regulation as an Output of Signal Transduction Pathways; 2.1. Relative timescales of environmental fluctuations and biological responses; 2.2. Three main classes of protein transcription factors; 2.2.1. One-component transcriptional regulatory systems; 2.2.2. Two-component systems; 2.2.3. Alternative sigma factors
  • 2.3. Other regulatory systems2.4. Signal integration at the gene promoters; 3. Mapping Transcriptional Regulatory Networks; 3.1. Regulons and transcriptional regulatory networks; 3.2. Experimental characterization of regulons; 3.2.1. Global transcription profiling; 3.2.2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation for protein binding site localization; 3.3. Reverse engineering transcriptional regulatory networks; 3.4. Characterization of conserved regulatory networks using comparative genomics; 3.4.1. Homologues, orthologs, and paralogs; 3.4.2. Detecting conserved regulatory sequences
  • 3.4.3. Operon predictions4. Factors Shaping the Functional Composition of Regulons; 4.1. Signal integration; 4.2. Signal correlation; 4.3. The concept of core and extended regulons; 4.4. The dynamics of transcription factor binding sites; 4.5. Regulons evolve rapidly; 5. Evolution of Transcription Factor Functions; 5.1. The duplication and divergence model; 5.2. The role of lateral gene transfer; 5.3. Extended regulons may facilitate the evolution of new transcription factor functions; 6. Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter Two:Vibrio fischeri Metabolism: Symbiosis and Beyond
  • 1. Introduction2. V. fischeri as a Model Organism; 2.1. V. fischeri and bioluminescence; 2.2. V. fischeri and quorum sensing; 2.3. V. fischeri and symbiosis; 3. What are the Nutrient Sources for Symbiotic V. fischeri?; 3.1. Carbon sources; 3.2. Iron sources; 3.3. Summary; 4. Which V. fischeri Metabolic Pathways are Used in the Host?; 4.1. Aerobic respiration; 4.2. Anaerobic respiration; 4.3. Fermentation; 4.4. The acetate switch; 4.5. Summary; 5. What Regulatory Proteins are Controlling Expression of these Metabolic Pathways?; 5.1. Chitin utilization: NagC
  • 5.2. Heme utilization: Fur and H-NOX5.3. Anaerobic respiration: FNR; 5.4. Acetate metabolism: LitR; 5.5. Summary; 6. Which Pathways Might be Important in V. fischeris Free-Living Lifestyle?; 7. Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter Three:Environmental Heme Utilization by Heme-Auxotrophic Bacteria; 1. Introduction; 2. Biological Importance and Function of the Heme Molecule; 2.1. Heme function; 2.2. Heme synthesis; 3. HAB that Utilize Heme; 3.1. Inventory of HAB; 3.2. Lifestyle of the best-characterized HAB; 3.2.1. HAB with essential heme requirements
Control code
823654159
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 338 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780123978158
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)823654159

Library Locations

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      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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