Coverart for item
The Resource Aspectuality across languages : event construal in speech and gesture, edited by Alan Cienki, Olga K. Iriskhanova

Aspectuality across languages : event construal in speech and gesture, edited by Alan Cienki, Olga K. Iriskhanova

Label
Aspectuality across languages : event construal in speech and gesture
Title
Aspectuality across languages
Title remainder
event construal in speech and gesture
Statement of responsibility
edited by Alan Cienki, Olga K. Iriskhanova
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The book provides a nuanced, multimodal perspective on how people express events via certain grammatical forms of verbs in speech and certain qualities of movement in manual gestures. The volume is the outcome of an international project that involved three teams: one each from France, Germany, and Russia, including scholars from the Netherlands and the United States. 0Aspect and gesture use are studied in three Indo-European languages, i.e. French, German, and Russian. The book also summarizes the main points and arguments from French, German, and Russian works on aspect in relation to tense, bringing these historical traditions together for an English-speaking reading audience. 0The work rekindles some fundamental theorizing about events and aspect, reinvigorating it in a new light with the use of recent theorizing from cognitive linguistics and cognitive psychology, as well as new research methods applied to new data from actual spoken, interactive language use. It illustrates the value of researching the variably multimodal nature of communication - as well as theoretical issues in connection with thinking for speaking and mental simulation - from an empirical point of view
Member of
Cataloging source
NhCcYBP
Dewey number
415
Index
index present
LC call number
P291.E945
LC item number
A76 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
ProQuest (Firm)
Series statement
Human cognitive processing,
Series volume
v. 62
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Grammar, Comparative and general
  • Grammar, Comparative and general
  • Semantics
  • Events (Philosophy)
Label
Aspectuality across languages : event construal in speech and gesture, edited by Alan Cienki, Olga K. Iriskhanova
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • main research questions
  • Speakers' verbal expression of event construal: Quantitative and qualitative analyses
  • 1.
  • Introduction: Construal of events in spoken narrative (Iriskhanova)
  • 1.1.
  • Basic features of narrative discourse
  • 1.2.
  • Basic features of spoken narratives
  • 1.3.
  • Some preliminary remarks on the textual data
  • 2.
  • ch. 1
  • French speakers' verbal expression of event construal (Morgenstern, Boutet, Debras)
  • 2.1.
  • Background on the uses of tenses in narratives
  • 2.2.
  • Quantitative analyses
  • 2.3.
  • Qualitative analyses
  • 2.3.1.
  • Difference between the passe compose and the imparfait
  • 2.3.2.
  • Aspect through the lens of event construal
  • Use of the present tense in narratives
  • 2.3.3.
  • Alternation between imparfait, present simple, and passe compose
  • 2.4.
  • Concluding remarks
  • 3.
  • German speakers' verbal expression of event construal (Muller)
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction: Specifics of aspectual event construal in tense forms in spoken German
  • 3.2.
  • 1.
  • Quantitative analyses: Use of Prateritum and Perfekt in spoken German as compared to French use of imparfait and passe compose
  • 3.3.
  • Qualitative analyses: The use of Prateritum and Perfekt in spoken German
  • 3.4.
  • Discussion
  • 4.
  • Russian speakers' verbal expression of event construal (Denisova, Iriskhanova)
  • 4.1.
  • Introducing general specifics of tense and aspect use in spoken Russian narratives
  • 4.2.
  • On events and aspect
  • Quantitative analysis: General results for Russian verbs
  • 4.3.
  • Qualitative analyses of Russian verbs
  • 4.3.1.
  • Some preliminary remarks on the specifics of Russian spoken narratives
  • 4.3.2.
  • Tense and aspect as related to the specifics of spoken narratives
  • 4.3.3.
  • Semantic features of verbs as related to the specifics of spoken narratives
  • 4.3.4.
  • 1.1.
  • Structural features of verbs as related to the specifics of spoken narratives
  • 4.4.
  • Concluding remarks
  • 5.
  • Summary (Iriskhanova)
  • ch. 4
  • Speakers' gestural expression of event construal: Quantitative and qualitative analyses
  • 1.
  • Introduction (Boutet, Morgenstern, Cienki)
  • 1.1.
  • Events: An historical and philosophical overview
  • Choice of the coding protocol for gesture analysis
  • 1.2.
  • Inter-coder reliability
  • 1.3.
  • Category-specific particularities
  • 1.4.
  • Summing up
  • 2.
  • French speakers' gestural expression of event construal (Boutet, Morgenstern)
  • 2.1.
  • 1.1.1.
  • Introduction: Hypothesis for French
  • 2.2.
  • Boundary schemas in French gestures
  • 2.2.1.
  • Quantitative results
  • 2.2.2.
  • Qualitative analyses
  • 2.2.3.
  • Counterexamples: The role of lexical aspect and the multi-functionality of gestures
  • 2.3.
  • Events as phenomena on the levels of cognition, language, and communication (Iriskhanova)
  • Conclusion
  • 3.
  • German (Muller)
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction: Hypothesis for German
  • 3.2.
  • Results of boundary schema analysis for German
  • 3.2.1.
  • Quantitative results
  • 3.2.2.
  • 1.1.2.
  • Qualitative analyses
  • 3.2.2.1.
  • Use of bounded gestures with Perfekt and unbounded gestures with Prateritum
  • 3.2.2.2.
  • Some reasons for the distribution of bounded and unbounded gestures with the Prateritum
  • 3.3.
  • Discussion: German as a complex case
  • 4.
  • Russian (Denisova, Iriskhanova, Cienki)
  • 4.1.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Various approaches to the study of events in philosophy (Iriskhanova)
  • Introduction: Hypothesis for Russian
  • 4.2.
  • Results of boundary schema analysis for Russian
  • 4.2.1.
  • Quantitative results
  • 4.2.2.
  • Additional factors analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively
  • 4.2.2.1.
  • Preliminary analysis
  • 4.2.2.2.
  • 1.1.3.
  • In-depth analysis
  • 4.2.2.3.
  • Results and discussion
  • 4.3.
  • Conclusion
  • 5.
  • Summary (Cienki, Muller)
  • ch. 5
  • Looking ahead: Kinesiological analysis (Boutet, Morgenstern, Cienki)
  • 1.
  • Various approaches to the study of events in linguistics (Iriskhanova)
  • Initial main concepts
  • 1.1.
  • Segments
  • 1.2.
  • Degrees of freedom
  • 2.
  • kinesiological view of gesture
  • 2.1.
  • Intrinsically multiple frames of reference
  • 2.2.
  • 1.1.4.
  • geometry associated with space
  • 2.3.
  • Dynamics
  • 3.
  • Movement (motor) control from a kinesiological perspective
  • 3.1.
  • Velocity in relation to shape
  • 3.2.
  • opposition of phase law
  • 3.3.
  • Studying the internal structure of event construal: Points in common from philosophy and linguistics (Iriskhanova)
  • principle of isochrony
  • 3.4.
  • Codman's paradox
  • 3.5.
  • Types of motion transfer
  • 3.6.
  • Discussion
  • 4.
  • Case study: Kinesiological analysis of the French gesture data
  • 4.1.
  • 1.1.5.
  • Propagation flow and perfectivity
  • 4.2.
  • Number and type of segments and perfectivity
  • 4.3.
  • Qualitative analyses
  • 5.
  • Discussion
  • ch. 6
  • Comprehension of event construal from multimodal communication (Becker, Gonzalez-Marquez)
  • 1.
  • Recent cognitive linguistic approaches (Cienki)
  • Approaches in psychology
  • 1.1.
  • Psychology as a way of knowing
  • 1.2.
  • Theories in cognitive psychology
  • 1.2.1.
  • Situation models in discourse processing
  • 1.2.1.1.
  • Event Indexing Model
  • 1.2.1.2.
  • 1.1.5.1.
  • Dynamic View
  • 1.2.2.
  • Event segmentation theory
  • 2.
  • Background to the comprehension experiment
  • 2.1.
  • Introduction to the comprehension experiment
  • 2.2.
  • Hypotheses
  • 3.
  • Background on construal in cognitive linguistics
  • Methods
  • 3.1.
  • Participants
  • 3.2.
  • Materials
  • 3.2.1.
  • Language background
  • 3.2.2.
  • Video clips
  • 3.2.3.
  • 1.1.5.2.
  • Program
  • 3.3.
  • Procedure
  • 4.
  • Results
  • 4.1.
  • Reporting of results
  • 4.2.
  • French
  • 4.3.
  • 1.
  • Imaging systems in language
  • German
  • 4.4.
  • Russian
  • 4.5.
  • Interim summary
  • 4.6.
  • Combined analyses
  • 5.
  • Discussion of combined analyses
  • 6.
  • 1.1.5.3.
  • Conclusion
  • 7.
  • Afterword: The need for interdisciplinary collaboration
  • Construal in cognitive grammar
  • 1.1.5.4.
  • Looking ahead
  • 1.2.
  • Aspect across traditions: Main lines of research (Iriskhanova, Morgenstern, Muller, Richter)
  • 1.2.1.
  • Aspect -- Aktionsart -- Vid -- Aspectuality
  • 1.2.2.
  • Introduction
  • Early studies of aspect in French, German, and Russian linguistics
  • 1.2.3.
  • Present-day studies of aspect: Some specific issues
  • 1.2.4.
  • Present-day studies of aspect: Points of convergence
  • 1.2.4.1.
  • influence of Anglo-American theories of aspect: Blurring grammatical and lexical aspect
  • 1.2.4.2.
  • Using conceptual boundaries
  • 1.2.5.
  • 2.
  • Conclusion
  • 2.
  • Background on talk-based multimodal communication
  • 2.1.
  • Thinking for speaking and gesturing (Cienki)
  • 2.1.1.
  • Linguistic relativity hypothesis
  • 2.1.2.
  • Thinking for speaking
  • 2.2.
  • Semantics approached from the perspective of conceptualization and mental simulation
  • Gestures as movement
  • 2.2.1.
  • Visual and proprioceptive modalities
  • 2.2.1.1.
  • Gestures derive from imagistic thinking (Boutet)
  • 2.2.1.2.
  • Visual perception of gestures (Boutet)
  • 2.2.1.3.
  • importance of proprioception (Boutet)
  • 2.2.1.4.
  • 3.
  • G̀ain control' (Becker)
  • 2.2.2.
  • Gestures as motion events (Muller)
  • 2.2.3.
  • Introducing the notion of boundary schemas (Muller)
  • 2.3.
  • Summing up: Aspect as amodal or as modality-dependent (Boutet, Morgenstern, Cienki)
  • ch. 2
  • Researching aspect in multimodal communication: Consequences for data and methods
  • 1.
  • Beyond language -- visible action expressing conceptualization
  • Introduction (Cienki)
  • 2.
  • choice of data and method of elicitation for the production studies (Cienki, Becker)
  • 3.
  • Categories used for the analysis of event construal in spoken language (Cienki)
  • 4.
  • Categories used for the analysis of event construal in gesture
  • 4.1.
  • Features for the gesture phases: Determining the unit of analysis (Boutet, Muller)
  • 4.2.
  • 4.
  • Pulse of effort as a kinesiological criterion (Boutet)
  • 4.3.
  • Bounded and unbounded schemas (Boutet, Muller)
  • 5.
  • Bringing it all together: Annotation and coding (Boutet, Morgenstern)
  • 5.1.
  • Choice of controlled vocabulary
  • 5.2.
  • Choice of the type of template and hierarchy
  • ch. 3
Control code
MSTDDA5518234
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027263698
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Aspectuality across languages : event construal in speech and gesture, edited by Alan Cienki, Olga K. Iriskhanova
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • main research questions
  • Speakers' verbal expression of event construal: Quantitative and qualitative analyses
  • 1.
  • Introduction: Construal of events in spoken narrative (Iriskhanova)
  • 1.1.
  • Basic features of narrative discourse
  • 1.2.
  • Basic features of spoken narratives
  • 1.3.
  • Some preliminary remarks on the textual data
  • 2.
  • ch. 1
  • French speakers' verbal expression of event construal (Morgenstern, Boutet, Debras)
  • 2.1.
  • Background on the uses of tenses in narratives
  • 2.2.
  • Quantitative analyses
  • 2.3.
  • Qualitative analyses
  • 2.3.1.
  • Difference between the passe compose and the imparfait
  • 2.3.2.
  • Aspect through the lens of event construal
  • Use of the present tense in narratives
  • 2.3.3.
  • Alternation between imparfait, present simple, and passe compose
  • 2.4.
  • Concluding remarks
  • 3.
  • German speakers' verbal expression of event construal (Muller)
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction: Specifics of aspectual event construal in tense forms in spoken German
  • 3.2.
  • 1.
  • Quantitative analyses: Use of Prateritum and Perfekt in spoken German as compared to French use of imparfait and passe compose
  • 3.3.
  • Qualitative analyses: The use of Prateritum and Perfekt in spoken German
  • 3.4.
  • Discussion
  • 4.
  • Russian speakers' verbal expression of event construal (Denisova, Iriskhanova)
  • 4.1.
  • Introducing general specifics of tense and aspect use in spoken Russian narratives
  • 4.2.
  • On events and aspect
  • Quantitative analysis: General results for Russian verbs
  • 4.3.
  • Qualitative analyses of Russian verbs
  • 4.3.1.
  • Some preliminary remarks on the specifics of Russian spoken narratives
  • 4.3.2.
  • Tense and aspect as related to the specifics of spoken narratives
  • 4.3.3.
  • Semantic features of verbs as related to the specifics of spoken narratives
  • 4.3.4.
  • 1.1.
  • Structural features of verbs as related to the specifics of spoken narratives
  • 4.4.
  • Concluding remarks
  • 5.
  • Summary (Iriskhanova)
  • ch. 4
  • Speakers' gestural expression of event construal: Quantitative and qualitative analyses
  • 1.
  • Introduction (Boutet, Morgenstern, Cienki)
  • 1.1.
  • Events: An historical and philosophical overview
  • Choice of the coding protocol for gesture analysis
  • 1.2.
  • Inter-coder reliability
  • 1.3.
  • Category-specific particularities
  • 1.4.
  • Summing up
  • 2.
  • French speakers' gestural expression of event construal (Boutet, Morgenstern)
  • 2.1.
  • 1.1.1.
  • Introduction: Hypothesis for French
  • 2.2.
  • Boundary schemas in French gestures
  • 2.2.1.
  • Quantitative results
  • 2.2.2.
  • Qualitative analyses
  • 2.2.3.
  • Counterexamples: The role of lexical aspect and the multi-functionality of gestures
  • 2.3.
  • Events as phenomena on the levels of cognition, language, and communication (Iriskhanova)
  • Conclusion
  • 3.
  • German (Muller)
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction: Hypothesis for German
  • 3.2.
  • Results of boundary schema analysis for German
  • 3.2.1.
  • Quantitative results
  • 3.2.2.
  • 1.1.2.
  • Qualitative analyses
  • 3.2.2.1.
  • Use of bounded gestures with Perfekt and unbounded gestures with Prateritum
  • 3.2.2.2.
  • Some reasons for the distribution of bounded and unbounded gestures with the Prateritum
  • 3.3.
  • Discussion: German as a complex case
  • 4.
  • Russian (Denisova, Iriskhanova, Cienki)
  • 4.1.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Various approaches to the study of events in philosophy (Iriskhanova)
  • Introduction: Hypothesis for Russian
  • 4.2.
  • Results of boundary schema analysis for Russian
  • 4.2.1.
  • Quantitative results
  • 4.2.2.
  • Additional factors analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively
  • 4.2.2.1.
  • Preliminary analysis
  • 4.2.2.2.
  • 1.1.3.
  • In-depth analysis
  • 4.2.2.3.
  • Results and discussion
  • 4.3.
  • Conclusion
  • 5.
  • Summary (Cienki, Muller)
  • ch. 5
  • Looking ahead: Kinesiological analysis (Boutet, Morgenstern, Cienki)
  • 1.
  • Various approaches to the study of events in linguistics (Iriskhanova)
  • Initial main concepts
  • 1.1.
  • Segments
  • 1.2.
  • Degrees of freedom
  • 2.
  • kinesiological view of gesture
  • 2.1.
  • Intrinsically multiple frames of reference
  • 2.2.
  • 1.1.4.
  • geometry associated with space
  • 2.3.
  • Dynamics
  • 3.
  • Movement (motor) control from a kinesiological perspective
  • 3.1.
  • Velocity in relation to shape
  • 3.2.
  • opposition of phase law
  • 3.3.
  • Studying the internal structure of event construal: Points in common from philosophy and linguistics (Iriskhanova)
  • principle of isochrony
  • 3.4.
  • Codman's paradox
  • 3.5.
  • Types of motion transfer
  • 3.6.
  • Discussion
  • 4.
  • Case study: Kinesiological analysis of the French gesture data
  • 4.1.
  • 1.1.5.
  • Propagation flow and perfectivity
  • 4.2.
  • Number and type of segments and perfectivity
  • 4.3.
  • Qualitative analyses
  • 5.
  • Discussion
  • ch. 6
  • Comprehension of event construal from multimodal communication (Becker, Gonzalez-Marquez)
  • 1.
  • Recent cognitive linguistic approaches (Cienki)
  • Approaches in psychology
  • 1.1.
  • Psychology as a way of knowing
  • 1.2.
  • Theories in cognitive psychology
  • 1.2.1.
  • Situation models in discourse processing
  • 1.2.1.1.
  • Event Indexing Model
  • 1.2.1.2.
  • 1.1.5.1.
  • Dynamic View
  • 1.2.2.
  • Event segmentation theory
  • 2.
  • Background to the comprehension experiment
  • 2.1.
  • Introduction to the comprehension experiment
  • 2.2.
  • Hypotheses
  • 3.
  • Background on construal in cognitive linguistics
  • Methods
  • 3.1.
  • Participants
  • 3.2.
  • Materials
  • 3.2.1.
  • Language background
  • 3.2.2.
  • Video clips
  • 3.2.3.
  • 1.1.5.2.
  • Program
  • 3.3.
  • Procedure
  • 4.
  • Results
  • 4.1.
  • Reporting of results
  • 4.2.
  • French
  • 4.3.
  • 1.
  • Imaging systems in language
  • German
  • 4.4.
  • Russian
  • 4.5.
  • Interim summary
  • 4.6.
  • Combined analyses
  • 5.
  • Discussion of combined analyses
  • 6.
  • 1.1.5.3.
  • Conclusion
  • 7.
  • Afterword: The need for interdisciplinary collaboration
  • Construal in cognitive grammar
  • 1.1.5.4.
  • Looking ahead
  • 1.2.
  • Aspect across traditions: Main lines of research (Iriskhanova, Morgenstern, Muller, Richter)
  • 1.2.1.
  • Aspect -- Aktionsart -- Vid -- Aspectuality
  • 1.2.2.
  • Introduction
  • Early studies of aspect in French, German, and Russian linguistics
  • 1.2.3.
  • Present-day studies of aspect: Some specific issues
  • 1.2.4.
  • Present-day studies of aspect: Points of convergence
  • 1.2.4.1.
  • influence of Anglo-American theories of aspect: Blurring grammatical and lexical aspect
  • 1.2.4.2.
  • Using conceptual boundaries
  • 1.2.5.
  • 2.
  • Conclusion
  • 2.
  • Background on talk-based multimodal communication
  • 2.1.
  • Thinking for speaking and gesturing (Cienki)
  • 2.1.1.
  • Linguistic relativity hypothesis
  • 2.1.2.
  • Thinking for speaking
  • 2.2.
  • Semantics approached from the perspective of conceptualization and mental simulation
  • Gestures as movement
  • 2.2.1.
  • Visual and proprioceptive modalities
  • 2.2.1.1.
  • Gestures derive from imagistic thinking (Boutet)
  • 2.2.1.2.
  • Visual perception of gestures (Boutet)
  • 2.2.1.3.
  • importance of proprioception (Boutet)
  • 2.2.1.4.
  • 3.
  • G̀ain control' (Becker)
  • 2.2.2.
  • Gestures as motion events (Muller)
  • 2.2.3.
  • Introducing the notion of boundary schemas (Muller)
  • 2.3.
  • Summing up: Aspect as amodal or as modality-dependent (Boutet, Morgenstern, Cienki)
  • ch. 2
  • Researching aspect in multimodal communication: Consequences for data and methods
  • 1.
  • Beyond language -- visible action expressing conceptualization
  • Introduction (Cienki)
  • 2.
  • choice of data and method of elicitation for the production studies (Cienki, Becker)
  • 3.
  • Categories used for the analysis of event construal in spoken language (Cienki)
  • 4.
  • Categories used for the analysis of event construal in gesture
  • 4.1.
  • Features for the gesture phases: Determining the unit of analysis (Boutet, Muller)
  • 4.2.
  • 4.
  • Pulse of effort as a kinesiological criterion (Boutet)
  • 4.3.
  • Bounded and unbounded schemas (Boutet, Muller)
  • 5.
  • Bringing it all together: Annotation and coding (Boutet, Morgenstern)
  • 5.1.
  • Choice of controlled vocabulary
  • 5.2.
  • Choice of the type of template and hierarchy
  • ch. 3
Control code
MSTDDA5518234
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027263698
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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