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The Resource Biogeochemistry of marine dissolved organic matter, edited by Dennis A. Hansell, Craig A. Carlson

Biogeochemistry of marine dissolved organic matter, edited by Dennis A. Hansell, Craig A. Carlson

Label
Biogeochemistry of marine dissolved organic matter
Title
Biogeochemistry of marine dissolved organic matter
Statement of responsibility
edited by Dennis A. Hansell, Craig A. Carlson
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of molecules found throughout the world's oceans. It plays a key role in the export, distribution, and sequestration of carbon in the oceanic water column, posited to be a source of atmospheric climate regulation. Biogeochemistry of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter, Second Edition, focuses on the chemical constituents of DOM and its biogeochemical, biological, and ecological significance in the global ocean, and provides a single, unique source for the references, information, and informed judgments of the community of marine biogeochemists. Presented by some of the world's leading scientists, this revised edition reports on the major advances in this area and includes new chapters covering the role of DOM in ancient ocean carbon cycles, the long term stability of marine DOM, the biophysical dynamics of DOM, fluvial DOM qualities and fate, and the Mediterranean Sea. Biogeochemistry of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter, Second Edition, is an extremely useful resource that helps people interested in the largest pool of active carbon on the planet (DOC) get a firm grounding on the general paradigms and many of the relevant references on this topic"--
Member of
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
YDXCP
Dewey number
551.46/6
Index
no index present
LC call number
GC118
LC item number
.B56 2014
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Hansell, Dennis A.
  • Carlson, Craig A.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Seawater
  • Chemical oceanography
  • Biogeochemistry
  • Biogeochemistry
  • Chemical oceanography
  • Seawater
  • Kemisk oceanografi
  • Oceanografi
  • Geokemi
Label
Biogeochemistry of marine dissolved organic matter, edited by Dennis A. Hansell, Craig A. Carlson
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Machine generated contents note: 1
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Biogeochemistry of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Contributors; Foreword; References; Preface; Chapter 1: Why Dissolved Organics Matter: DOC in Ancient Oceans and Past Climate Change ; I. Overview; II. Marine Carbon Cycling; A.A Tale of Three Ocean Carbon "Pumps"; B.A Fourth Appears-The Microbial Carbon Pump; III. Interpreting the Geological Past; A. Carbon Isotopes as Proxies for Past Global Carbon Cycle Changes; B. Reconstructing Past Steady-State Modes of Global Carbon Cycling; C. Interpreting Transient Carbon Cycle Perturbations
  • D. Ocean DOC and Ancient Carbon Cycling: An Example from the Paleocene and EoceneE. Ocean DOC and Ancient Carbon Cycling: An Example from the Precambrian; IV. Implications for Future Global Change?; Acknowledgements; References; Chapter 2: Chemical Characterization and Cycling of Dissolved Organic Matter; I. Introduction; II. Isolation of DOM from Seawater; A. Isolation of Hydrophobic DOM by Solid-Phase Extraction; B. Isolation of High Molecular Weight DOM by Ultrafiltration; C. Isolation of DOM by Reverse Osmosis/Electrically Assisted Dialysis; III. Chemical Characterization of DOM
  • A. Polysaccharides in DOMB. Proteins and Amino Acids in DOM; C. Humic Substances in Solid-Phase Extractable DOM (SPE-DOM); 1. Characterization of SPE-DOM by High-Field NMR; 2. Characterization of SPE-DOM by High-Resolution MS; IV. Links Between DOM Composition and Cycling; A. Composition and the Cycling of Labile DOM; B. Composition and the Cycling of Semi-Labile DOM; C. Composition and the Cycling of Refractory DOM; V. Future Research; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter 3: DOM Sources, Sinks, Reactivity, and Budgets; I. Introduction; II. DOM Production Processes
  • A. Extracellular Phytoplankton Production1. Extracellular Release Models; a. Overflow Model; b. Passive Diffusion Mode; c. Model Comparison; 2. Experimental and Field Observations; a. Using Radioisotopic Tracers; b. Microcosm, Mesocosm, and Field Observations; c. ER Quality and Transparent Exopolymer Particles; B. Grazer-Induced DOM Production; 1. Herbivory; a. Mesozooplankton; b. Microzooplankton; 2. Omnivory and Carnivory; 3. Bacterivory; 4. Biogeochemical Significance; C. DOM Production via Cell Lysis; 1. Viral Lysis and the Viral Shunt; a. Biogeochemical Significance; 2. Bacterial Lysis
  • 3. AllelopathyD. Solubilization of Particles; E. Prokaryote Production of DOM; 1. Chemoautotrophy; 2. Chemoheterotrophy; III. DOM Removal Processes; A. Biotic Consumption of DOM; 1. Prokaryotes; a. Bacterial Growth Efficiency; b. Bacterial Carbon Demand; c. Photoheterotrophy; 2. Eukaryotes; B. Abiotic Removal Processes; 1. Phototransformation; 2. Sorption of DOM onto Particles; 3. Condensation of Marine Microgels; 4. Hydrothermal Circulation; IV. DOM Accumulation; A. Abiotic Formation of Biologically Recalcitrant DOM; B. Biotic Formation of Recalcitrant DOM; 1. Microbial Carbon Pump
Control code
894139619
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
Second edition.
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780124071537
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)894139619
Label
Biogeochemistry of marine dissolved organic matter, edited by Dennis A. Hansell, Craig A. Carlson
Publication
Note
Machine generated contents note: 1
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Biogeochemistry of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Contributors; Foreword; References; Preface; Chapter 1: Why Dissolved Organics Matter: DOC in Ancient Oceans and Past Climate Change ; I. Overview; II. Marine Carbon Cycling; A.A Tale of Three Ocean Carbon "Pumps"; B.A Fourth Appears-The Microbial Carbon Pump; III. Interpreting the Geological Past; A. Carbon Isotopes as Proxies for Past Global Carbon Cycle Changes; B. Reconstructing Past Steady-State Modes of Global Carbon Cycling; C. Interpreting Transient Carbon Cycle Perturbations
  • D. Ocean DOC and Ancient Carbon Cycling: An Example from the Paleocene and EoceneE. Ocean DOC and Ancient Carbon Cycling: An Example from the Precambrian; IV. Implications for Future Global Change?; Acknowledgements; References; Chapter 2: Chemical Characterization and Cycling of Dissolved Organic Matter; I. Introduction; II. Isolation of DOM from Seawater; A. Isolation of Hydrophobic DOM by Solid-Phase Extraction; B. Isolation of High Molecular Weight DOM by Ultrafiltration; C. Isolation of DOM by Reverse Osmosis/Electrically Assisted Dialysis; III. Chemical Characterization of DOM
  • A. Polysaccharides in DOMB. Proteins and Amino Acids in DOM; C. Humic Substances in Solid-Phase Extractable DOM (SPE-DOM); 1. Characterization of SPE-DOM by High-Field NMR; 2. Characterization of SPE-DOM by High-Resolution MS; IV. Links Between DOM Composition and Cycling; A. Composition and the Cycling of Labile DOM; B. Composition and the Cycling of Semi-Labile DOM; C. Composition and the Cycling of Refractory DOM; V. Future Research; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter 3: DOM Sources, Sinks, Reactivity, and Budgets; I. Introduction; II. DOM Production Processes
  • A. Extracellular Phytoplankton Production1. Extracellular Release Models; a. Overflow Model; b. Passive Diffusion Mode; c. Model Comparison; 2. Experimental and Field Observations; a. Using Radioisotopic Tracers; b. Microcosm, Mesocosm, and Field Observations; c. ER Quality and Transparent Exopolymer Particles; B. Grazer-Induced DOM Production; 1. Herbivory; a. Mesozooplankton; b. Microzooplankton; 2. Omnivory and Carnivory; 3. Bacterivory; 4. Biogeochemical Significance; C. DOM Production via Cell Lysis; 1. Viral Lysis and the Viral Shunt; a. Biogeochemical Significance; 2. Bacterial Lysis
  • 3. AllelopathyD. Solubilization of Particles; E. Prokaryote Production of DOM; 1. Chemoautotrophy; 2. Chemoheterotrophy; III. DOM Removal Processes; A. Biotic Consumption of DOM; 1. Prokaryotes; a. Bacterial Growth Efficiency; b. Bacterial Carbon Demand; c. Photoheterotrophy; 2. Eukaryotes; B. Abiotic Removal Processes; 1. Phototransformation; 2. Sorption of DOM onto Particles; 3. Condensation of Marine Microgels; 4. Hydrothermal Circulation; IV. DOM Accumulation; A. Abiotic Formation of Biologically Recalcitrant DOM; B. Biotic Formation of Recalcitrant DOM; 1. Microbial Carbon Pump
Control code
894139619
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
Second edition.
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780124071537
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)894139619

Library Locations

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      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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