Coverart for item
The Resource Bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications : from fundamentals to translational medicine, edited by Giuseppe Perale and Jöns Hilborn

Bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications : from fundamentals to translational medicine, edited by Giuseppe Perale and Jöns Hilborn

Label
Bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications : from fundamentals to translational medicine
Title
Bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications
Title remainder
from fundamentals to translational medicine
Statement of responsibility
edited by Giuseppe Perale and Jöns Hilborn
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
IDEBK
Dewey number
610.28/4
Index
index present
LC call number
R857.P6
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Perale, Giuseppe
  • Hilborn, J. G.
Series statement
Woodhead Publishing series in biomaterials
Series volume
number 120
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Polymers in medicine
  • HEALTH & FITNESS / Holism
  • HEALTH & FITNESS / Reference
  • MEDICAL / Alternative Medicine
  • MEDICAL / Atlases
  • MEDICAL / Essays
  • MEDICAL / Family & General Practice
  • MEDICAL / Holistic Medicine
  • MEDICAL / Osteopathy
  • Polymers in medicine
Label
Bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications : from fundamentals to translational medicine, edited by Giuseppe Perale and Jöns Hilborn
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Bioresorbable Polymers for Biomedical Applications; Related titles; Bioresorbable Polymers for Biomedical Applications: From Fundamentals to Translational Medicine; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of contributors; Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials; Foreword; 1 A quick glance at history; 2 Joining forces; 3 Some facts and figures; 4 Imaging the future; 5 So what about bioresorbable polymers?; One -- Fundamentals and considerations of bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications; 1 -- Introduction to bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications
  • 1.1 General concepts1.2 History of biopolymers technology; 1.2.1 Degradability, toxicity, and biocompatibility; 1.2.2 Compounding, mechanical properties, and degradation time; 1.2.3 Extrusion and fiber manufacturing; 1.2.4 Molding; 1.2.5 Coating, solvent casting, and foaming; 1.2.6 Hydrogels manufacturing; 1.2.7 Micro- and nanoparticles manufacturing; 1.2.8 Additive manufacturing; 1.2.9 Composite materials; 1.2.10 Sterilization; 1.3 State of art; 1.3.1 Aliphatic polyesters; 1.3.2 Natural biopolymers; 1.3.3 Poly(ester-ether); 1.3.4 Poly(ortho esters); 1.3.5 Polyphosphazenes
  • 1.3.6 Polyanhydrides1.3.7 Poly(amino acids); 1.3.8 Polyalkylcyanoacrylates; 1.3.9 Poly(propylene fumarate); 1.3.10 Poly(vinyl alcohol); 1.4 Future trends; References; 2 -- Natural polymers: a source of inspiration; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Typical production processes for biomaterial synthesis; 2.2.1 Self-assembly; 2.2.2 Template-driven reproduction; 2.3 Exceptional material properties found in nature; 2.3.1 Superhydrophobicity; 2.3.2 Adhesion; 2.3.3 Self-healing; 2.4 Natural biomaterials and mimics thereof used for tissue engineering; 2.4.1 Decellularized extracellular matrix; 2.4.2 Collagen
  • 2.4.3 Elastin and elastin-like macromolecules2.4.4 Silk; 2.4.5 Scaffolds from marine origin; 2.5 Bioadhesives and medical glues; 2.5.1 Bioadhesives in the wet and dry environment; 2.5.2 Strong adhesive systems; 2.5.3 Weak adhesive systems; 2.6 Polymers used in drug delivery/release systems; 2.6.1 Natural drug carriers versus smart drug release systems; 2.6.2 Drug delivery on request; 2.7 Conclusions; References; 3 -- Bioresorbability of polymers: chemistry, mechanisms, and modeling; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Degradation pathway and factors affecting degradation rate
  • 3.3 Modeling degradation of bioresorbable polymers3.3.1 Empirical models; 3.3.2 Semiempirical models; 3.3.3 Mechanistic models; 3.3.3.1 Deterministic models; 3.3.3.2 Stochastic models; References; 4 -- The innate immune response: a key factor in biocompatibility; 4.1 Immune system; 4.2 Innate immunity; 4.3 Complement system; 4.4 The contact/kallikrein and coagulation systems; 4.5 Thromboinflammation; 4.6 Innate immunity activation on artificial material surfaces; 4.7 Foreign body reactions on biomaterials; 4.8 Degradation of commonly used resorbable polymers
Control code
957655145
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780081002667
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
950131
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)957655145
Label
Bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications : from fundamentals to translational medicine, edited by Giuseppe Perale and Jöns Hilborn
Publication
Note
Includes index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Bioresorbable Polymers for Biomedical Applications; Related titles; Bioresorbable Polymers for Biomedical Applications: From Fundamentals to Translational Medicine; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of contributors; Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials; Foreword; 1 A quick glance at history; 2 Joining forces; 3 Some facts and figures; 4 Imaging the future; 5 So what about bioresorbable polymers?; One -- Fundamentals and considerations of bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications; 1 -- Introduction to bioresorbable polymers for biomedical applications
  • 1.1 General concepts1.2 History of biopolymers technology; 1.2.1 Degradability, toxicity, and biocompatibility; 1.2.2 Compounding, mechanical properties, and degradation time; 1.2.3 Extrusion and fiber manufacturing; 1.2.4 Molding; 1.2.5 Coating, solvent casting, and foaming; 1.2.6 Hydrogels manufacturing; 1.2.7 Micro- and nanoparticles manufacturing; 1.2.8 Additive manufacturing; 1.2.9 Composite materials; 1.2.10 Sterilization; 1.3 State of art; 1.3.1 Aliphatic polyesters; 1.3.2 Natural biopolymers; 1.3.3 Poly(ester-ether); 1.3.4 Poly(ortho esters); 1.3.5 Polyphosphazenes
  • 1.3.6 Polyanhydrides1.3.7 Poly(amino acids); 1.3.8 Polyalkylcyanoacrylates; 1.3.9 Poly(propylene fumarate); 1.3.10 Poly(vinyl alcohol); 1.4 Future trends; References; 2 -- Natural polymers: a source of inspiration; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Typical production processes for biomaterial synthesis; 2.2.1 Self-assembly; 2.2.2 Template-driven reproduction; 2.3 Exceptional material properties found in nature; 2.3.1 Superhydrophobicity; 2.3.2 Adhesion; 2.3.3 Self-healing; 2.4 Natural biomaterials and mimics thereof used for tissue engineering; 2.4.1 Decellularized extracellular matrix; 2.4.2 Collagen
  • 2.4.3 Elastin and elastin-like macromolecules2.4.4 Silk; 2.4.5 Scaffolds from marine origin; 2.5 Bioadhesives and medical glues; 2.5.1 Bioadhesives in the wet and dry environment; 2.5.2 Strong adhesive systems; 2.5.3 Weak adhesive systems; 2.6 Polymers used in drug delivery/release systems; 2.6.1 Natural drug carriers versus smart drug release systems; 2.6.2 Drug delivery on request; 2.7 Conclusions; References; 3 -- Bioresorbability of polymers: chemistry, mechanisms, and modeling; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Degradation pathway and factors affecting degradation rate
  • 3.3 Modeling degradation of bioresorbable polymers3.3.1 Empirical models; 3.3.2 Semiempirical models; 3.3.3 Mechanistic models; 3.3.3.1 Deterministic models; 3.3.3.2 Stochastic models; References; 4 -- The innate immune response: a key factor in biocompatibility; 4.1 Immune system; 4.2 Innate immunity; 4.3 Complement system; 4.4 The contact/kallikrein and coagulation systems; 4.5 Thromboinflammation; 4.6 Innate immunity activation on artificial material surfaces; 4.7 Foreign body reactions on biomaterials; 4.8 Degradation of commonly used resorbable polymers
Control code
957655145
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780081002667
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
950131
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)957655145

Library Locations

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      37.955220 -91.772210
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