Coverart for item
The Resource Cookies, coleslaw, and stoops : the influence of Dutch on the North American languages, Nicoline van der Sijs

Cookies, coleslaw, and stoops : the influence of Dutch on the North American languages, Nicoline van der Sijs

Label
Cookies, coleslaw, and stoops : the influence of Dutch on the North American languages
Title
Cookies, coleslaw, and stoops
Title remainder
the influence of Dutch on the North American languages
Statement of responsibility
Nicoline van der Sijs
Title variation
Influence of Dutch on the North American languages
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • dut
  • eng
Summary
"In 1609, the first Dutch settlers arrived in America and established trading posts, small towns, and forts up and down what we now call the Hudson River. To this day, American children are taught the thrilling history of the transformation of this settlement, New Netherland, and its capital, New Amsterdam, from landmark port into present-day New York State and the island of Manhattan. But, the Dutch legacy extended far beyond New York, as Cookies, Coleslaw and Stoops reveals. From Santa Claus (after the Dutch folklore saint Sinterklaas) and his sleigh (the pronunciation of the Dutch slee is almost identical) to a dumbhead talking poppycock, the contributions of the Dutch language to American English are indelibly embedded to some of our most vernacular terms and expressions. The menu in most of our restaurants sports some originally Dutch names, and even our dollar is named after a Dutch coin (daalder). In this captivating volume, the renowned linguist Nicoline van der Sijs glosses over 300 Dutch loan words like these that traveled to the New World on board the Dutch ship the Halve Maan, captained by Henry Hudson, which dropped anchor in Manhattan more than 400 years ago. Surprisingly, the Dutch also gave several Native American languages words for everyday things like "pants", "cat" and "turkey". Lively and accessible, the information presented in this volume charts the journey of these words into the American territory and languages, from more obscure uses which maybe have survived in only regional dialects to such ubiquitous contributions to our language like Yankee, cookie, and dope. Each entry marks the original arrival of its term into American English and adds up-to-date information on its evolving meaning, etymology, and regional spread. Not to be missed by anyone with a passion for the history behind our everyday expressions, Cookies, Coleslaw and Stoops is the perfect gift for the linguistic adventurer in us all"--Publisher's description
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Sijs, Nicoline van der
Dewey number
422.43931
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • music
Index
index present
Language note
Text in English; translated from Dutch
LC call number
PE1582.D88
LC item number
S5413 2009eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Nederlandse Taalunie
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English language
  • English language
  • Humanities
  • History
  • Language
  • linguistics
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • HISTORY
  • English language
  • United States
  • Amerikaans
  • Indianentalen
  • Nederlands
  • Culturele invloeden
Label
Cookies, coleslaw, and stoops : the influence of Dutch on the North American languages, Nicoline van der Sijs
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 300-308) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.3
  • Dutch place-names from the seventeenth century
  • 1.4
  • Dutch and double Dutch
  • 1.5
  • The American Dutch, American Flemish and American Frisian of nineteenth- and twentieth-century immigrants
  • 1.6
  • Dutch place-names from the nineteenth and twentieth century
  • 1.7
  • The Dutch language and culture in the US, anno 2009
  • 1.
  • 2.
  • Dutch words that have left their mark on American English: a thematic glossary
  • 2.0
  • Introduction: sources and structure of the glossary
  • 2.1
  • Food, drink, and stimulants
  • 2.2
  • Flora and fauna
  • 2.3
  • Household effects and everyday implements
  • The Dutch language in North America
  • 2.4
  • Polity and citizens
  • 2.5
  • The American landscape
  • 2.6
  • Human traits and characterizations
  • 2.7
  • Religion and religious festivals
  • 2.8
  • In and around the house
  • 1.0
  • 2.9
  • Trade
  • 2.10
  • Money and units of measure
  • 2.11
  • Children's language
  • 2.12
  • Transport by sea and land
  • 2.13
  • Clothing
  • "The last real speaker of the dialect"
  • 2.14
  • Miscellaneous
  • 2.15
  • Dutch loanwords that did not originate from immigrants
  • 2.16
  • Conclusion
  • 3.
  • Dutch infl uence on North American Indian languages
  • 3.0
  • Introduction
  • 1.1
  • 3.1
  • Delaware Jargon
  • 3.2
  • Amerindian languages that were spoken on the East Coast in the seventeenth century
  • 3.3
  • Thematic overview of Dutch loanwords
  • 3.4
  • Alphabetical survey of Dutch loanwords
  • 3.5
  • Conclusion
  • Dutch colonists and Native Americans
  • Bibliography
  • List of illustrations
  • Index to the American English words in chapter 2
  • 1.2
  • The Dutch language on the American East Coast: Low Dutch
  • Ch 1. The Dutch language in North America -- ch 2. Dutch words that have left their mark on American English : a thematic glossary -- ch 3. Dutch influence on North American Indian languages -- Bibliography -- Index to the American English words in chapter 2
Control code
607892002
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (320 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789048510429
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations, maps, music
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt45s4w2
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)607892002
Label
Cookies, coleslaw, and stoops : the influence of Dutch on the North American languages, Nicoline van der Sijs
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 300-308) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.3
  • Dutch place-names from the seventeenth century
  • 1.4
  • Dutch and double Dutch
  • 1.5
  • The American Dutch, American Flemish and American Frisian of nineteenth- and twentieth-century immigrants
  • 1.6
  • Dutch place-names from the nineteenth and twentieth century
  • 1.7
  • The Dutch language and culture in the US, anno 2009
  • 1.
  • 2.
  • Dutch words that have left their mark on American English: a thematic glossary
  • 2.0
  • Introduction: sources and structure of the glossary
  • 2.1
  • Food, drink, and stimulants
  • 2.2
  • Flora and fauna
  • 2.3
  • Household effects and everyday implements
  • The Dutch language in North America
  • 2.4
  • Polity and citizens
  • 2.5
  • The American landscape
  • 2.6
  • Human traits and characterizations
  • 2.7
  • Religion and religious festivals
  • 2.8
  • In and around the house
  • 1.0
  • 2.9
  • Trade
  • 2.10
  • Money and units of measure
  • 2.11
  • Children's language
  • 2.12
  • Transport by sea and land
  • 2.13
  • Clothing
  • "The last real speaker of the dialect"
  • 2.14
  • Miscellaneous
  • 2.15
  • Dutch loanwords that did not originate from immigrants
  • 2.16
  • Conclusion
  • 3.
  • Dutch infl uence on North American Indian languages
  • 3.0
  • Introduction
  • 1.1
  • 3.1
  • Delaware Jargon
  • 3.2
  • Amerindian languages that were spoken on the East Coast in the seventeenth century
  • 3.3
  • Thematic overview of Dutch loanwords
  • 3.4
  • Alphabetical survey of Dutch loanwords
  • 3.5
  • Conclusion
  • Dutch colonists and Native Americans
  • Bibliography
  • List of illustrations
  • Index to the American English words in chapter 2
  • 1.2
  • The Dutch language on the American East Coast: Low Dutch
  • Ch 1. The Dutch language in North America -- ch 2. Dutch words that have left their mark on American English : a thematic glossary -- ch 3. Dutch influence on North American Indian languages -- Bibliography -- Index to the American English words in chapter 2
Control code
607892002
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (320 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789048510429
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations, maps, music
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
22573/ctt45s4w2
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)607892002

Library Locations

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      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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