Coverart for item
The Resource Fluency in native and nonnative English speech, Sandra Götz, Justus Liebig University, Giessen

Fluency in native and nonnative English speech, Sandra Götz, Justus Liebig University, Giessen

Label
Fluency in native and nonnative English speech
Title
Fluency in native and nonnative English speech
Statement of responsibility
Sandra Götz, Justus Liebig University, Giessen
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This book takes a new and holistic approach to fluency in English speech and differentiates between productive, perceptive, and nonverbal fluency. The in-depth corpus-based description of productive fluency points out major differences of how fluency is established in native and nonnative speech. It also reveals areas in which even highly advanced learners of English still deviate strongly from the native target norm and in which they have already approximated to it
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Götz, Sandra
Dewey number
428.0071
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Language note
English
LC call number
P53.4115
LC item number
.F58 2013eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Studies in Corpus Linguistics SCL,
Series volume
vol. 53
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Fluency (Language learning)
  • Native language and education
  • English language
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • English language
  • Fluency (Language learning)
  • Native language and education
  • Taalvaardigheid
  • Engels
  • Moedertaalsprekers
  • Tweedetaalverwerving
Label
Fluency in native and nonnative English speech, Sandra Götz, Justus Liebig University, Giessen
Instantiates
Publication
Note
6.2.1 Combination of individual fluencemes in LOCNEC
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Fluency in Native and Nonnative English Speech; Editorial page; Title page; LCC data; Dedication page; Table of contents; Acknowledgements; List of tables; List of figures; List of Abbreviations and acronyms; Chapter 1. Fluency in English speech; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Fluency in native and nonnative speech; 1.3 Learning English in Germany; 1.4 Investigating fluency: Fluencemes and target norms; 1.5 A theoretical approach to fluency in speech; 1.6 Fluency in native and nonnative English speech: Preview; Chapter 2. Productive fluency; 2.1 Temporal variables; 2.1.1 Speech rate
  • 2.1.2 Mean length of runs (MLR)2.1.3 Unfilled pauses; 2.1.4 The phonation/time ratio; 2.1.5 Summary; 2.2 Formulaic sequences; 2.2.1 Characteristics of formulaic sequences; 2.2.2 Formulaic sequences and fluency; 2.2.3 Analyzing formulaic sequences; 2.2.4 Formulaic sequences in nonnative speech; 2.2.5 Summary; 2.3 Performance phenomena; 2.3.1 Performance phenomena in native speech; 2.3.2 Performance phenomena in nonnative speech; 2.3.3 Speech management strategies; 2.3.4 Discourse markers and smallwords; 2.3.5 Confluence; 2.3.6 Towards fluency enhancement strategies; 2.4 Summary
  • Chapter 3. Perceptive fluency3.1 Perceptive fluency in native and nonnative speech; 3.2 Accuracy; 3.2.1 Accuracy in native speech; 3.2.2 Accuracy in nonnative speech; 3.3 Idiomaticity; 3.3.1 Idiomaticity in native speech; 3.3.2 Idiomaticity in nonnative speech; 3.4 Intonation; 3.4.1 Intonation in native speech; 3.4.2 Intonation in nonnative speech; 3.5 Accent; 3.5.1 Accent in native speech; 3.5.2 Accent in nonnative speech; 3.6 Pragmatic features; 3.6.1 Pragmatic features in native speech; 3.6.2 Pragmatic features in nonnative speech; 3.7 Lexical diversity
  • 3.7.1 Lexical diversity in native speech3.7.2 Lexical diversity in nonnative speech; 3.8 Sentence structure; 3.8.1 Sentence structure in native speech; 3.8.2 Sentence structure in nonnative speech; 3.9 Summary; Chapter 4. Nonverbal fluency; 4.1 Nonverbal fluency in native speech; 4.2 Nonverbal fluency in nonnative speech; 4.3 Summary; Chapter 5. Corpus data and methodology; 5.1 A corpus-based description of fluency in native and nonnative English speech; 5.2 Learner corpus research, fluency and SLA; 5.3 Corpora and tools; 5.4 Methodology; 5.4.1 Pilot study; 5.5 A holistic approach to fluency
  • 5.5.1 Productive fluency: Quantitative and statistical data analysis5.5.2 Perceptive fluency: Native-speaker perception of five selected learners; 5.6 Summary; Chapter 6. Data analysis of productive fluencyin LINDSEI-GE vs. LOCNEC; 6.1 Productive Fluency: Learner data vs. native-speaker data; 6.1.1 Speech rate; 6.1.2 Mean length of runs; 6.1.3 Unfilled pauses; 6.1.4 Formulaic sequences; 6.1.5 Repeats; 6.1.6 Filled pauses; 6.1.7 Discourse markers; 6.1.8 Smallwords; 6.1.9 Summary, caveats and implications; 6.2 Correlations and combinations: Bringing together the fluencemes
Control code
830163512
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xxiii, 238 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027203588
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)830163512
Label
Fluency in native and nonnative English speech, Sandra Götz, Justus Liebig University, Giessen
Publication
Note
6.2.1 Combination of individual fluencemes in LOCNEC
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Fluency in Native and Nonnative English Speech; Editorial page; Title page; LCC data; Dedication page; Table of contents; Acknowledgements; List of tables; List of figures; List of Abbreviations and acronyms; Chapter 1. Fluency in English speech; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Fluency in native and nonnative speech; 1.3 Learning English in Germany; 1.4 Investigating fluency: Fluencemes and target norms; 1.5 A theoretical approach to fluency in speech; 1.6 Fluency in native and nonnative English speech: Preview; Chapter 2. Productive fluency; 2.1 Temporal variables; 2.1.1 Speech rate
  • 2.1.2 Mean length of runs (MLR)2.1.3 Unfilled pauses; 2.1.4 The phonation/time ratio; 2.1.5 Summary; 2.2 Formulaic sequences; 2.2.1 Characteristics of formulaic sequences; 2.2.2 Formulaic sequences and fluency; 2.2.3 Analyzing formulaic sequences; 2.2.4 Formulaic sequences in nonnative speech; 2.2.5 Summary; 2.3 Performance phenomena; 2.3.1 Performance phenomena in native speech; 2.3.2 Performance phenomena in nonnative speech; 2.3.3 Speech management strategies; 2.3.4 Discourse markers and smallwords; 2.3.5 Confluence; 2.3.6 Towards fluency enhancement strategies; 2.4 Summary
  • Chapter 3. Perceptive fluency3.1 Perceptive fluency in native and nonnative speech; 3.2 Accuracy; 3.2.1 Accuracy in native speech; 3.2.2 Accuracy in nonnative speech; 3.3 Idiomaticity; 3.3.1 Idiomaticity in native speech; 3.3.2 Idiomaticity in nonnative speech; 3.4 Intonation; 3.4.1 Intonation in native speech; 3.4.2 Intonation in nonnative speech; 3.5 Accent; 3.5.1 Accent in native speech; 3.5.2 Accent in nonnative speech; 3.6 Pragmatic features; 3.6.1 Pragmatic features in native speech; 3.6.2 Pragmatic features in nonnative speech; 3.7 Lexical diversity
  • 3.7.1 Lexical diversity in native speech3.7.2 Lexical diversity in nonnative speech; 3.8 Sentence structure; 3.8.1 Sentence structure in native speech; 3.8.2 Sentence structure in nonnative speech; 3.9 Summary; Chapter 4. Nonverbal fluency; 4.1 Nonverbal fluency in native speech; 4.2 Nonverbal fluency in nonnative speech; 4.3 Summary; Chapter 5. Corpus data and methodology; 5.1 A corpus-based description of fluency in native and nonnative English speech; 5.2 Learner corpus research, fluency and SLA; 5.3 Corpora and tools; 5.4 Methodology; 5.4.1 Pilot study; 5.5 A holistic approach to fluency
  • 5.5.1 Productive fluency: Quantitative and statistical data analysis5.5.2 Perceptive fluency: Native-speaker perception of five selected learners; 5.6 Summary; Chapter 6. Data analysis of productive fluencyin LINDSEI-GE vs. LOCNEC; 6.1 Productive Fluency: Learner data vs. native-speaker data; 6.1.1 Speech rate; 6.1.2 Mean length of runs; 6.1.3 Unfilled pauses; 6.1.4 Formulaic sequences; 6.1.5 Repeats; 6.1.6 Filled pauses; 6.1.7 Discourse markers; 6.1.8 Smallwords; 6.1.9 Summary, caveats and implications; 6.2 Correlations and combinations: Bringing together the fluencemes
Control code
830163512
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xxiii, 238 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027203588
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)830163512

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