Coverart for item
The Resource "If you love that lady don't marry her" : the courtship letters of Sally McDowell and John Miller, 1854-1856, edited by Thomas E. Buckley

"If you love that lady don't marry her" : the courtship letters of Sally McDowell and John Miller, 1854-1856, edited by Thomas E. Buckley

Label
"If you love that lady don't marry her" : the courtship letters of Sally McDowell and John Miller, 1854-1856
Title
"If you love that lady don't marry her"
Title remainder
the courtship letters of Sally McDowell and John Miller, 1854-1856
Statement of responsibility
edited by Thomas E. Buckley
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
""If You Love That Lady Don't Marry Her" is a fascinating collection of almost five hundred letters between John Miller (1819-1895) and Sally Campbell Preston McDowell (1821-1895). Their correspondence began in early August 1854 and continued until their marriage in November 1856. The oldest daughter of the late Governor James McDowell of Virginia, Sally McDowell owned and managed Colalto, the family plantation. She was considered part of the South's social and political elite. John Miller, a widower with two young children, was a Presbyterian minister in Philadelphia. Son of Samuel Miller, a founder of Princeton Theological Seminary, he was one of the North's most prominent clergymen. McDowell and Miller literally fell in love by mail, but one major obstacle blocked their marriage: Sally McDowell was a divorced woman. She had been wed to Governor Francis Thomas of Maryland, but his jealousy and cruelty soon drove her from Annapolis. Although an 1846 legislative divorce freed her to remarry legally, it was not socially acceptable to do so, especially not to "a man of the cloth." So when Miller and McDowell announced their plan to marry, social pressure cost him his pulpit and made her the object of extreme criticism from family members and friends. Although Miller was initially determined to wed despite any opposition, he eventually settled for a long-term engagement to preserve McDowell's social position. Apart from a few brief visits, Miller and McDowell's relationship depended entirely upon letters. Begun in carefully guarded terms, these letters soon evolved into intimate explorations of their deepening love, their respective gender roles, the problems created by divorce, and religious and familial obligations. McDowell provides the unusual feminist perspective of a divorced woman in mid-nineteenth-century America. As she probes her own inner world, her correspondence with Miller becomes a healing experience through which she gradually surmounts the limitations she experiences as a woman, her depression and the fears resulting from her first marriage, and the stigma of divorce. Ultimately her self- revelations lead to their marriage in November 1856, which lasted until their deaths a week apart almost forty years later. Because of their unique situation, Miller and McDowell committed to paper the private thoughts and feelings that most couples would have expressed in person. Although their personal relationship forms the principal subject of these letters, the couple also discussed such issues as the growing sectional tensions, national and state politics and politicians, literary figures, church meetings and personages, slave management and behavior, and family and community values and attitudes. Eloquently written, these letters offer a unique window on American society on the eve of the Civil War. They also reveal important information about gender roles and relationships in nineteenth-century America."--BOOK JACKET
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1821-1895
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McDowell, Sally Campbell Preston
Dewey number
  • 975.5/03/0922
  • B
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
BX9225.M39
LC item number
A4 2000
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1819-1895
  • 1939-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Miller, John
  • Buckley, Thomas E.
  • University of Missouri Press
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Presbyterian Church
  • McDowell, Sally Campbell Preston
  • Miller, John
  • McDowell family
  • Miller family
Label
"If you love that lady don't marry her" : the courtship letters of Sally McDowell and John Miller, 1854-1856, edited by Thomas E. Buckley
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
43520961
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xliv, 896 pages
Isbn
9780826212788
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
00023994
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, map
Label
"If you love that lady don't marry her" : the courtship letters of Sally McDowell and John Miller, 1854-1856, edited by Thomas E. Buckley
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
43520961
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xliv, 896 pages
Isbn
9780826212788
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
00023994
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, map

Library Locations

    • Curtis Laws Wilson LibraryBorrow it
      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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