Coverart for item
The Resource Inversion in Modern English : Form and Function

Inversion in Modern English : Form and Function

Label
Inversion in Modern English : Form and Function
Title
Inversion in Modern English
Title remainder
Form and Function
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The book offers a comprehensive study of the different forms of subject-verb and subject-auxiliary-inversion in Modern English declarative sentences. It treats inversion as a speaker-based decision for reordering within a fairly rigid word order system and identifies the meaning of the construction in terms of point of view and speaker subjectivity. This semantic claim is tested against the occurrence, as well as the absence, of the different forms of inversion in natural discourse. The analysis of the pragmatics and discourse function of inversion is based on the LOB and the Brown corpus
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Dorgeloh, Heidrun
Dewey number
425
Index
no index present
LC call number
PE1390
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
Label
Inversion in Modern English : Form and Function
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • INVERSION IN MODERN ENGLISH FORM AND FUNCTION; Editorial page; Title page; Copyright page; Table of Contents; Abbreviations; Chapter 1. Introduction; Chapter 2. Word order in English: Some theoretical preliminaries; 2.1 Basic concepts; 2.1.1 Topic; 2.1.2 Focus; 2.1.3 The clause as representation, exchange and message; 2.2 English within word order-based language typologies; 2.3 Basic and natural word order; Chapter 3. Inversion in English: The state of the art; 3.1 A preliminary typology; 3.1.1 Types of inversion excluded; 3.1.2 The FI and SAI types; 3.1.2.1 Full inversion (FI)
  • 3.1.2.2 Subject-auxiliary-inversion (SAI)3.2 Diachronic aspects; 3.2.1 Inversion in earlier stages of English; 3.2.2 Inversion and grammaticalisation; 3.3 Two formal hypotheses; 3.3.1 Inversion as a root transformation; 3.3.2 ""Mixed"" subject status in full inversion; 3.4 The functional claims; 3.4.1 Focus-marking and the presentative functio; 3.4.2 The information-packaging claim; 3.5 Related phenomena; 3.5.1 There-insertion; 3.5.2 Preposing and initial adverbial placement; 3.5.3 Left-dislocation; Chapter 4. The semantics of inversion
  • 4.1 The semantics of choice: inverted vs. canonical word order4.1.1 On the nature of the semiotic process; 4.1.2 Full inversion vs. canonical word order; 4.1.2.1 A deictic presentative prototype; 4.1.2.2 The lexical presentative type of FI; 4.1.2.3 The lexical predicative type of FI; 4.1.2.4 The anaphoric/cataphoric type; 4.1.3 Subject-auxiliary-inversion vs. canonical word order; 4.2 Viewpoint and subjectivity in inversion; 4.2.1 Inversion in embedded constructions; 4.2.2 Viewpoint analysis of main clause full inversion; 4.2.3 Focus management through point of view
  • 4.2.4 Markedness, unexpectedness and emotive meaning4.3 Summary: a functional classification of English inversion; Chapter 5. Inversion in discourse; 5.1 Inversion and other textual relations; 5.1.1 Spoken vs. written mode; 5.1.2 Colloquial vs. literary style; 5.1.3 British vs. American English; 5.2 Inversion and categories of discourse; 5.2.1 Discourse types and discourse typologies; 5.2.1.1 Function and structure -- basic discourse types; 5.2.1.2 Convention -- the status of genre; 5.2.2 Inversion in a corpus of written non-fictional discourse
  • 5.2.2.1 Syntactic variation and a corpus-based approach5.2.2.2 Inversion in five text categories of the LOB and the Brown corpus; 5.2.2.3 Typical uses and characteristics of text categories; 5.3 Inversion and discourse under conditions of displacement; 5.3.1 Basic affinities in non-fictional discourse; 5.3.2 Displaced immediacy, organisation of discourse and comment in political news reporting; 5.4 Summary: inversion as a discourse marker; Chapter 6. Summary and conclusion; Appendix. Corpustexts and other sources of occurrences; Notes; References; Name Index; Subject Index
Control code
769344117
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (246 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027275820
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)769344117
Label
Inversion in Modern English : Form and Function
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • INVERSION IN MODERN ENGLISH FORM AND FUNCTION; Editorial page; Title page; Copyright page; Table of Contents; Abbreviations; Chapter 1. Introduction; Chapter 2. Word order in English: Some theoretical preliminaries; 2.1 Basic concepts; 2.1.1 Topic; 2.1.2 Focus; 2.1.3 The clause as representation, exchange and message; 2.2 English within word order-based language typologies; 2.3 Basic and natural word order; Chapter 3. Inversion in English: The state of the art; 3.1 A preliminary typology; 3.1.1 Types of inversion excluded; 3.1.2 The FI and SAI types; 3.1.2.1 Full inversion (FI)
  • 3.1.2.2 Subject-auxiliary-inversion (SAI)3.2 Diachronic aspects; 3.2.1 Inversion in earlier stages of English; 3.2.2 Inversion and grammaticalisation; 3.3 Two formal hypotheses; 3.3.1 Inversion as a root transformation; 3.3.2 ""Mixed"" subject status in full inversion; 3.4 The functional claims; 3.4.1 Focus-marking and the presentative functio; 3.4.2 The information-packaging claim; 3.5 Related phenomena; 3.5.1 There-insertion; 3.5.2 Preposing and initial adverbial placement; 3.5.3 Left-dislocation; Chapter 4. The semantics of inversion
  • 4.1 The semantics of choice: inverted vs. canonical word order4.1.1 On the nature of the semiotic process; 4.1.2 Full inversion vs. canonical word order; 4.1.2.1 A deictic presentative prototype; 4.1.2.2 The lexical presentative type of FI; 4.1.2.3 The lexical predicative type of FI; 4.1.2.4 The anaphoric/cataphoric type; 4.1.3 Subject-auxiliary-inversion vs. canonical word order; 4.2 Viewpoint and subjectivity in inversion; 4.2.1 Inversion in embedded constructions; 4.2.2 Viewpoint analysis of main clause full inversion; 4.2.3 Focus management through point of view
  • 4.2.4 Markedness, unexpectedness and emotive meaning4.3 Summary: a functional classification of English inversion; Chapter 5. Inversion in discourse; 5.1 Inversion and other textual relations; 5.1.1 Spoken vs. written mode; 5.1.2 Colloquial vs. literary style; 5.1.3 British vs. American English; 5.2 Inversion and categories of discourse; 5.2.1 Discourse types and discourse typologies; 5.2.1.1 Function and structure -- basic discourse types; 5.2.1.2 Convention -- the status of genre; 5.2.2 Inversion in a corpus of written non-fictional discourse
  • 5.2.2.1 Syntactic variation and a corpus-based approach5.2.2.2 Inversion in five text categories of the LOB and the Brown corpus; 5.2.2.3 Typical uses and characteristics of text categories; 5.3 Inversion and discourse under conditions of displacement; 5.3.1 Basic affinities in non-fictional discourse; 5.3.2 Displaced immediacy, organisation of discourse and comment in political news reporting; 5.4 Summary: inversion as a discourse marker; Chapter 6. Summary and conclusion; Appendix. Corpustexts and other sources of occurrences; Notes; References; Name Index; Subject Index
Control code
769344117
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (246 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027275820
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)769344117

Library Locations

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      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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