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The Resource Linguistic polyphony : the Scandinavian approach : ScaPoLine, by Henning Nølke

Linguistic polyphony : the Scandinavian approach : ScaPoLine, by Henning Nølke

Label
Linguistic polyphony : the Scandinavian approach : ScaPoLine
Title
Linguistic polyphony
Title remainder
the Scandinavian approach : ScaPoLine
Statement of responsibility
by Henning Nølke
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Linguistic polyphony is an utterance act theory (la linguistique de l'énonciation) and is a French specialty. It deals with the numerous points of view that are likely to be communicated through an utterance. The book introduces utterance act theory and polyphony as such, but most especially focuses on the Scandinavian variant of polyphony, ScaPoLine. ScaPoLine is a formal linguistic theory whose main purpose is to specify the instructions conveyed through linguistic form for the creation of polyphonic meaning. The theoretical introduction is followed by polyphonic analyses of linguistic phenomena such as negation, mood, modality and connectors, and of textual phenomena such as represented discourse and irony. The book suggests how ScaPoLine could offer new insights within cross-linguistic and interdisciplinary studies
Member of
Cataloging source
NhCcYBP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Nølke, Henning
Dewey number
401/.452
Index
index present
LC call number
P123
LC item number
.N64 2017
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
ProQuest (Firm)
Series statement
Studies in Pragmatics
Series volume
16
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Linguistics
  • Linguistics
Label
Linguistic polyphony : the Scandinavian approach : ScaPoLine, by Henning Nølke
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.2.
  • 5.
  • Discourse Entities (DE)
  • 5.1.
  • First Person
  • 5.2.
  • Second Person
  • 5.3.
  • Third Person
  • 5.4.
  • Comments on the Classification
  • Emile Benveniste
  • 6.
  • Points of View (POVS)
  • 6.1.
  • Source
  • 6.2.
  • Judgement/Content
  • 6.3.
  • Baste POVS
  • 6.4.
  • Special POVS
  • 2.
  • 6.5.
  • Comments on the Classification
  • 7.
  • Utterance Links (LINKS)
  • 7.1.
  • Types
  • 7.2.
  • Recursion Problem
  • 7.3.
  • LINKS vs Commitment
  • UA Theories
  • 7.4.
  • Comments on the Classification
  • 8.
  • Polyphonic Structure (p-structure)
  • 8.1.
  • Monophony
  • 8.2.
  • Internal Polyphony
  • 8.3.
  • External Polyphony
  • 2.1.
  • 8.4.
  • Mixed Polyphony
  • 8.5.
  • Citation
  • 8.6.
  • Recapitulation
  • 9.
  • Final Remarks
  • 4.
  • Linguistic Analyses
  • Theory of Utterance Act Operations (TOE)
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • Negation ne ... pas
  • 1.1.
  • Pragmatic Meaning of Negation
  • 1.2.
  • Polyphonic Analysis
  • 1.3.
  • Triggers and Blockers
  • 1.4.
  • 2.2.
  • Conclusions
  • 2.
  • Subjunctive Mood
  • 3.
  • Locutionary Modalities
  • 3.1.
  • Modal Sentence Adverbials
  • 3.2.
  • Peut-etre
  • 3.3.
  • Formal Utterance Act Theory (Jean-Pierre Descles)
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Evidentiality
  • 4.1.
  • Il parait que and il semble que
  • 4.2.
  • Reportive Conditional
  • 5.
  • Ànnouncers'
  • 5.1.
  • 2.3.
  • Certes and Commitment/Taking-into-Account
  • 5.2.
  • Announcers and LINKS
  • 6.
  • Illocutionary Modalities
  • 7.
  • Connectors
  • 7.1.
  • Inference Rules and the Connector donc
  • 7.2.
  • Theory of Argumentation within Language (TAL)
  • Puisque
  • 7.3.
  • Topoi and the Connector mais
  • 8.
  • Syntactic Structure: Clefts
  • 9.
  • Combinations of Polyphonic Markers
  • 10.
  • Constructed Acts
  • 11.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • 2.4.
  • Conclusions
  • 5.
  • Text Analyses
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • General Considerations
  • 2.
  • Extended ScaPoLine
  • 2.1.
  • First Step
  • Utterance Act Theory of Focalisation (UATF)
  • 2.2.
  • Second Step
  • 2.3.
  • Polyphonic Passage
  • 2.4.
  • Conclusions
  • 3.
  • Represented Discourse (RD)
  • 3.1.
  • General Characteristics of RD
  • 2.5.
  • 3.2.
  • Four Prototypes
  • 3.3.
  • Enunciative Functions
  • 3.4.
  • Enunciative Incorporation
  • 3.5.
  • Synoptic Table
  • 3.6.
  • Some Linguistic Characteristics of RD
  • Dialogism
  • 3.7.
  • Syntactic Structure of RD
  • 3.8.
  • Expressions Conveying Shown Meaning (ECSM)
  • 3.9.
  • Deictic Expressions
  • 3.10.
  • Summary
  • 4.
  • Irony
  • 2.6.
  • 5.
  • Literary Text Analysis
  • 5.1.
  • Two Examples
  • 5.2.
  • Linguistic and Literary Polyphony
  • 5.3.
  • Can Linguistic Polyphony Analysis Support Literary Analysis?
  • 5.4.
  • Can (Polyphonic) Literary Analysis Enrich Linguistic Analysis?
  • Polyphony
  • 6.
  • Conclusion
  • 6.
  • Linguistic Polyphony in a Broader Perspective
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • Modular Approach
  • 2.
  • Cross-Linguistic Studies
  • 3.
  • 3.
  • Polyphony and Cognition
  • 4.
  • Polyphony and Sociology
  • 5.
  • C̀ompound' Disciplines
  • 6.
  • Conclusion
  • Conceptual Background
  • 3.1.
  • Basic Concepts
  • 1.
  • 3.2.
  • Modular Linguistics
  • 3.3.
  • Meaning
  • 3.4.
  • What Kind of Semantics?
  • 3.5.
  • Interpretation Model
  • 3.6.
  • Ideal Discourse
  • Utterance Act Linguistics (UAL)
  • 4.
  • Concluding Remarks
  • 2.
  • Polyphony
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • Polyphonic Music
  • 2.
  • Literary Polyphony
  • 3.
  • Introduction
  • Discourse Polyphony
  • 4.
  • Linguistic Polyphony
  • 4.1.
  • Historical Tree
  • 4.2.
  • Trunk: Oswald Ducrot (and Jean-Claude Anscombre)
  • 4.3.
  • Argumentative Theory of Polyphony (TAP)
  • 4.4.
  • 1.
  • Theory of Stereotypes
  • 4.5.
  • Theory of Discourse Representation (TDR)
  • 4.6.
  • ScaPoLine
  • 4.7.
  • Modal Theory of Polyphony (MTP)
  • 5.
  • Summary
  • 3.
  • Short History and General Characteristics
  • ScaPoLine: The Scandinavian Theory of Polyphony
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • Background
  • 1.1.
  • Brief History
  • 1.2.
  • Basic Insight
  • 2.
  • Methodological Considerations
  • 1.1.
  • 2.1.
  • Research Object
  • 2.2.
  • Polyphonic Structure and Polyphonic Configuration
  • 2.3.
  • Method of Analysis
  • 2.4.
  • Recapitulation
  • 3.
  • Configuration
  • Origins
  • 4.
  • LOC
  • 4.1.
  • Deixis
  • 4.2.
  • Speaker Comments
  • 4.3.
  • Speech Acts
  • 4.4.
  • Mimed LOC
Control code
MSTDDA4848109
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (pages.):
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789004341531
Isbn Type
(electronic bk.)
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Linguistic polyphony : the Scandinavian approach : ScaPoLine, by Henning Nølke
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.2.
  • 5.
  • Discourse Entities (DE)
  • 5.1.
  • First Person
  • 5.2.
  • Second Person
  • 5.3.
  • Third Person
  • 5.4.
  • Comments on the Classification
  • Emile Benveniste
  • 6.
  • Points of View (POVS)
  • 6.1.
  • Source
  • 6.2.
  • Judgement/Content
  • 6.3.
  • Baste POVS
  • 6.4.
  • Special POVS
  • 2.
  • 6.5.
  • Comments on the Classification
  • 7.
  • Utterance Links (LINKS)
  • 7.1.
  • Types
  • 7.2.
  • Recursion Problem
  • 7.3.
  • LINKS vs Commitment
  • UA Theories
  • 7.4.
  • Comments on the Classification
  • 8.
  • Polyphonic Structure (p-structure)
  • 8.1.
  • Monophony
  • 8.2.
  • Internal Polyphony
  • 8.3.
  • External Polyphony
  • 2.1.
  • 8.4.
  • Mixed Polyphony
  • 8.5.
  • Citation
  • 8.6.
  • Recapitulation
  • 9.
  • Final Remarks
  • 4.
  • Linguistic Analyses
  • Theory of Utterance Act Operations (TOE)
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • Negation ne ... pas
  • 1.1.
  • Pragmatic Meaning of Negation
  • 1.2.
  • Polyphonic Analysis
  • 1.3.
  • Triggers and Blockers
  • 1.4.
  • 2.2.
  • Conclusions
  • 2.
  • Subjunctive Mood
  • 3.
  • Locutionary Modalities
  • 3.1.
  • Modal Sentence Adverbials
  • 3.2.
  • Peut-etre
  • 3.3.
  • Formal Utterance Act Theory (Jean-Pierre Descles)
  • Conclusion
  • 4.
  • Evidentiality
  • 4.1.
  • Il parait que and il semble que
  • 4.2.
  • Reportive Conditional
  • 5.
  • Ànnouncers'
  • 5.1.
  • 2.3.
  • Certes and Commitment/Taking-into-Account
  • 5.2.
  • Announcers and LINKS
  • 6.
  • Illocutionary Modalities
  • 7.
  • Connectors
  • 7.1.
  • Inference Rules and the Connector donc
  • 7.2.
  • Theory of Argumentation within Language (TAL)
  • Puisque
  • 7.3.
  • Topoi and the Connector mais
  • 8.
  • Syntactic Structure: Clefts
  • 9.
  • Combinations of Polyphonic Markers
  • 10.
  • Constructed Acts
  • 11.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • 2.4.
  • Conclusions
  • 5.
  • Text Analyses
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • General Considerations
  • 2.
  • Extended ScaPoLine
  • 2.1.
  • First Step
  • Utterance Act Theory of Focalisation (UATF)
  • 2.2.
  • Second Step
  • 2.3.
  • Polyphonic Passage
  • 2.4.
  • Conclusions
  • 3.
  • Represented Discourse (RD)
  • 3.1.
  • General Characteristics of RD
  • 2.5.
  • 3.2.
  • Four Prototypes
  • 3.3.
  • Enunciative Functions
  • 3.4.
  • Enunciative Incorporation
  • 3.5.
  • Synoptic Table
  • 3.6.
  • Some Linguistic Characteristics of RD
  • Dialogism
  • 3.7.
  • Syntactic Structure of RD
  • 3.8.
  • Expressions Conveying Shown Meaning (ECSM)
  • 3.9.
  • Deictic Expressions
  • 3.10.
  • Summary
  • 4.
  • Irony
  • 2.6.
  • 5.
  • Literary Text Analysis
  • 5.1.
  • Two Examples
  • 5.2.
  • Linguistic and Literary Polyphony
  • 5.3.
  • Can Linguistic Polyphony Analysis Support Literary Analysis?
  • 5.4.
  • Can (Polyphonic) Literary Analysis Enrich Linguistic Analysis?
  • Polyphony
  • 6.
  • Conclusion
  • 6.
  • Linguistic Polyphony in a Broader Perspective
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • Modular Approach
  • 2.
  • Cross-Linguistic Studies
  • 3.
  • 3.
  • Polyphony and Cognition
  • 4.
  • Polyphony and Sociology
  • 5.
  • C̀ompound' Disciplines
  • 6.
  • Conclusion
  • Conceptual Background
  • 3.1.
  • Basic Concepts
  • 1.
  • 3.2.
  • Modular Linguistics
  • 3.3.
  • Meaning
  • 3.4.
  • What Kind of Semantics?
  • 3.5.
  • Interpretation Model
  • 3.6.
  • Ideal Discourse
  • Utterance Act Linguistics (UAL)
  • 4.
  • Concluding Remarks
  • 2.
  • Polyphony
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • Polyphonic Music
  • 2.
  • Literary Polyphony
  • 3.
  • Introduction
  • Discourse Polyphony
  • 4.
  • Linguistic Polyphony
  • 4.1.
  • Historical Tree
  • 4.2.
  • Trunk: Oswald Ducrot (and Jean-Claude Anscombre)
  • 4.3.
  • Argumentative Theory of Polyphony (TAP)
  • 4.4.
  • 1.
  • Theory of Stereotypes
  • 4.5.
  • Theory of Discourse Representation (TDR)
  • 4.6.
  • ScaPoLine
  • 4.7.
  • Modal Theory of Polyphony (MTP)
  • 5.
  • Summary
  • 3.
  • Short History and General Characteristics
  • ScaPoLine: The Scandinavian Theory of Polyphony
  • Introduction
  • 1.
  • Background
  • 1.1.
  • Brief History
  • 1.2.
  • Basic Insight
  • 2.
  • Methodological Considerations
  • 1.1.
  • 2.1.
  • Research Object
  • 2.2.
  • Polyphonic Structure and Polyphonic Configuration
  • 2.3.
  • Method of Analysis
  • 2.4.
  • Recapitulation
  • 3.
  • Configuration
  • Origins
  • 4.
  • LOC
  • 4.1.
  • Deixis
  • 4.2.
  • Speaker Comments
  • 4.3.
  • Speech Acts
  • 4.4.
  • Mimed LOC
Control code
MSTDDA4848109
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (pages.):
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789004341531
Isbn Type
(electronic bk.)
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

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      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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