Coverart for item
The Resource Power management for internet of everything, editors Mathieu Coustans, Catherine Dehollain

Power management for internet of everything, editors Mathieu Coustans, Catherine Dehollain

Label
Power management for internet of everything
Title
Power management for internet of everything
Statement of responsibility
editors Mathieu Coustans, Catherine Dehollain
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Addresses several advanced topics in the area of Power Management Analog and Mixed-Signal Circuits and Systems. The fundamental aspects of these topics are discussed, and state-of-the-art developments are presented. The book covers subject such as bio-sensors co-integration with nanotechnology.
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
Dewey number
004.678
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
TK7874.66
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Coustans, Mathieu
  • Dehollain, Catherine
Series statement
Tutorials in circuits and systems
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Internet of things
  • Electric power
  • Low voltage integrated circuits
  • TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING
  • Low voltage integrated circuits
  • Electric power
  • Internet of things
Summary expansion
In this book, several advanced topics in the area of Power Management Analog and Mixed-Signal Circuits and Systems have been addressed. The fundamental aspects of these topics are discussed, and state-of-the-art developments are presented. The book covers subject areas like bio-sensors co-integration with nanotechnology, and for these CMOS circuits one popular application could be personalized medicine. Having seen the power assets for such technologies, and knowing what challenges these present for the circuits and systems designer, remote powering and sensors solutions are reviewed in the second chapter. The third chapter contains an industrial contribution on remote powering, presenting energy harvesting from the RF field to power a target wireless sensor network consumption. Having touched the idea of the low current consumption, aeA or Nano-Amp range and their transient behaviours are also described. Digital and large-scale integrated circuits - seen from an academic point of view - is included in chapter five, and this same topic from an industrial point of view is given in the chapter thereafter. An additional topic on the hall sensor, applied in an automotive case study, is then also presented. Approaching the duty-cycling of active mode, oscillator for timers and system-level power management including the cloud are covered in the last chapters. Power Management for Internet of Everything targets post-graduate students and those persons active in industry, whom understand and can connect system design with system on chip (SoC) and mixed-signal design as broader set of circuits and systems. The topic of Internet of Things (IoT), ranging from data converters for sensor interfaces to radios and software application, is also addressed from the viewpoint of power and energy management. The contents ensures a good balance between academia and industry, combined with a judicious selection of distinguished international authors
Label
Power management for internet of everything, editors Mathieu Coustans, Catherine Dehollain
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover -- Half Title Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- Chapter 1- Applications in Biosensing of Power Delivery, by Sandro Carrara -- 1. Chips under the skin? -- 2. CommentFully-Connected Human++ -- 3. Wearable Devices by 2020 -- 4. Under-the-Skin Device & Wearable Patch -- 5. Under-the-Skin Device (I) -- 6. Under-the-Skin Device (II) -- 7. The electrochemical Cell -- 8. How to measure a redox reaction? -- 9. Control Amplifier @ RE -- 10. Risk of Saturation (I) -- 11. Risk of Saturation (II) -- 12. Faradaic Current @ Fixed Bias -- 13. Faradaic Current in Voltage Scan -- 14. Transimpedance Amplifier @ WER -- 15. Grounded Working -- 16. Inside the Cell: Faradaic Current -- 17. Outline -- 18. The challenges were ... -- 19. Multi-Panel Platforms for Metabolism Monitoring (I) -- 20. Oxidases for Markers Monitoring -- 21. Multi-Panel Platforms for Metabolism Monitoring (II) -- 22. Indirect Detection: e.g., the ATP -- 23. Multi-Panel Platforms for Metabolism Monitoring (III) -- 24. P450 for Drugs Monitoring -- 25. Breast cancer drugs cocktail -- 26. Multi-Platform design -- 27. Multiple Calibration Curves -- 28. Sensors Query in Time -- 29. Multi-Panel Platforms for Metabolism Monitoring -- 30. Response upon ionic changes -- 31. The challenges were ... -- 32. Problems on Detection Limits -- 33. An improved P450/Electrode coupling by using Carbon Nanotubes -- 34. Improved Detection Limit -- 35. Detection of Several Drugs -- 36. Nano-Bio-Sensors by drop-casting -- 37. Nano-Bio-Sensors by Micro-Spotting -- 38. Nano-Bio-Sensors by Electrodeposition -- 39. Nano-Bio-Sensors by CVD (I) -- 40. Nano-Bio-Sensors by CVD (II) -- 41. Four different techniques -- 42. Template-free Pt electrodepositions -- 43. Nanopetal-decorated Nanospheres -- 44. Direct Detection of Glucose
  • 45. Non-Enzymatic Glucose detection (in cell media!) -- 46. Response upon ionic changes (I) -- 47. Response upon ionic changes (II) -- 48. Validation with Cells: Osmotic Shock -- 49. Validation with Cells: Apoptosis -- 50. The challenges were ... -- 51. Reliability in Temperature & pH (I) -- 52. Reliability in Temperature & pH (II) -- 53. Resistance-to-pulse-width converter -- 54. The CMOS reader for Potentiometry -- 55. The challenges were ... -- 56. Energy Scavenging Strategies -- 57. Inductive Coupling -- 58. Measures on the Designed Inductors -- 59. The Tiny Spiral Inductors -- 60. The Tiny Spiral Inductors on Air -- 61. The Multi-layer Inductor on Tissue -- 62. The Realized Remote Powering Patch (I) -- 63. The Realized Remote Powering Patch (II) -- 64. The Android Interface (I) -- 65. The Android Interface (II) -- 66. Connectivity with Smart-Watch -- 67. Connectivity through Cloud -- 68. The challenges were ... -- 69. Implantable Chip -Fully Integration -- 70. IC interfaced to the passive platform -- 71. A reliable CMOS Frontend -- 72. The Chip Frontend -- 2nd prototype -- 73. The Chip Frontend -- 3rd prototype (I) -- 74. The Chip Frontend -- 3rd prototype (II) -- 75. Implantable Systems-In-Package -- 76. The IC Potentiostat (I) -- 77. The IC Potentiostat (II) -- 78. Biocompatible Packaging -- 79. Final Silicone Packaging -- 80. System Biocompatibility -- 81. The Approach for moving animals -- 82. Remote Monitoring in Translational Medicine (I) -- 83. Remote Monitoring in Translational Medicine (II) -- 84. Under the skin system -- 85. Endogenous in-vivo -- 86. Exogenous in-vivo -- 87. Power Supply continuity issue -- 88. Endogenous in-vitro -- 89. Exogenous in-vitro -- 90. Nano-Sensors on Integrated Circuits -- 91. A certain attention from international media -- 92. Under the skin for body sculpting -- 93. Enhancing human being
  • 94. Size and Shape to be injectable as a Needle? -- 95. Reveal LINQTM by Medtronic -- 96. Conclusions -- 97. Take home main message -- 98. Further Reading -- 99. Great thank to my team @ EPFL -- Chapter 2 -- Optimization of the Transfer of Power and of the Data Communication in the Case of Remotely Powered Sensor Networks, by Catherine Dehollain -- 1. Content -- PART 1 -- 2. ARCHITECTURES OF REMOTELY POWERED SENSOR NETWORKS -- 3. At the Boundary between Different Domains -- 4. Data Transfer Methods -- 5. Backscattering Modulation in far field -- 6. Load Modulation in near field -- 7. Wireless Active Transmitter -- 8. Wireless Remote Powering -- 9. Single Frequency for Power and Data -- 10. Dual Frequency for Power and Data -- 11. Knee Prosthesis Monitoring -- 12. Ultrasonic Powering and Data Communication -- 13. Digestive Track Diagnostic -- 14. Passive Memory Tag for High Data Rate -- 15. Magnetically-Coupled Remote Powering System for Freely Moving Animals -- 16. Specs for Freely Moving Laboratory Rodents -- 17. Implantable Bio-Monitoring System -- 18. Thermistor Response Curve -- 19. Low-power Implantable Chip -- 20. Local Temperature Sensing Chip -- 21. Time-domain Sensor Readout -- 22. Implemented Data Transmitter -- 23. Wireless Power and Data Transfer for Intracranial Epilepsy Monitoring -- 24. Drawbacks of Intracranial Neural Implants -- 25. Wireless Power and Data Transfer System -- 26. Power and Data for Epilepsy Monitoring -- 27. Far-Field Remotely Powered Wireless Sensor System -- 28. Adaptive Impedance Matching -- 29. CMOS Differential Rectifier -- 30. Passive UHF RFID Tag -- 31. Base Station and Tag Antennas -- 32. CMOS Differential Rectifier -- 33. Low Power Sensor Interface -- PART 2 -- 34. PASSIVE TRANSMITTERS THANKS TO BACKSCATTERING DATA COMMUNICATION -- 35. Backscattering Data Communication
  • 36. Implementation of the Data Communication -- 37. IF Backscattering Data Communication -- 38. Modulation Types -- 39. Read Range of Far Field RFID Systems -- 40. Effective Radar Cross Section -- 41. Estimation of the Maximum Distance Range -- 42. Parameters of the Tag and of the Reader -- 43. Measurements compared to Model -- 44. Radio Regulations -- 45. Passive Memory Tag -- 46. Dual Frequency Passive Memory Tag -- PART 3 -- 47. REMOTE POWER FORWIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS -- 48. Power by Electro-Magnetic Coupling -- 49. Remote Powering of an Implant -- 50. Geometry of the Coils -- 51. Comparison of the Two Types of Coupling -- 52. Solution 1: Fixed External Coils -- 53. Power Management of the Power Amplifiers -- 54. Solution 2: Moving External Coil -- 55. Solution 3: External Coil around the Cage -- 56. Conclusion -- Chapter 3 -- A System on Chip for Energy Harvesting and Wireless Power Transfer, by Roberto La Rosa -- 1. Presentation Outline -- 2. Impact of Energy Harvesting and WPT on IoT -- 3. WPT and Energy Harvesting Solutions -- 4. A Self-Powered RF IC for Energy Harvesting -- 5. Nulling Stand-by using Wireless Power Transfer -- 6. Nulling Stand-by in battery powered appliances -- 7. Quasi Nulling Stand-by in battery powered appliances -- 8. Nulling Stand-by in battery powered appliances -- 9. Quasi Nulling Stand-by in battery powered appliances -- 10. Nulling Stand-By in Europe would imply: -- 11. Nulling Stand-by in AC powered appliances -- 12. Over the distance Wireless Battery Charger -- 13. Powering Battery-Free Systems with WPT -- 14. Powering Battery-Free Systems with WPT -- 15. Powering Battery-Free Systems with WPT -- 16. Powering Battery-Free Systems with PV cell -- 17. Conclusions -- Chapter 4 -- Measuring and Analyzing Dynamic Current Profiles in Low Power Applications, by Dr. Christoph Zysset -- 1. Low Power Applications
  • 2. Current in Low Power Applications -- 3. Dynamic Currents in Low Power Apps (I) -- 4. Dynamic Currents in Low Power Apps (II) -- 5. Popular Measurement Approach -- 6. Current Measurement (I) -- 7. Current Measurement (II) -- 8. Current Measurement (III) -- 9. Gap-free Recording -- 10. Gap-free Recording -- Dead Time -- 11. Battery Emulation -- 12. So is there a solution? -- 13. Two approaches -- 14. DC Power Analyzer -- Dynamic Range -- 15. DC Power Analyzer -- Battery Emulation -- 16. DC Power Analyzer -- Gap-free Recording -- 17. DC Power Analyzer -- 18. Device Current Waveform Analyzer (I) -- 19. Device Current Waveform Analyzer (II) -- 20. Device Current Waveform Analyzer (III) -- 21. Measuring Dynamic Current Profiles in Low Power Applications is Not Trivial -- 22. There are solutions to this kind of measurement tasks -- Chapter 5 -- Challenges and Approached to Variation-Aware Digital Low Power VLSI Design for IoT, by Prof. Andreas Burg -- 1. Low Power Digital VLSI Design -- 2. Power Consumption Bottleneck -- 3. Power and Energy Consumption in CMOS -- 4. Voltage Scaling: The Hammer in the Toolbox of Every Low-Power Designer -- 5. Compensating for Frequency Loss at Scaled Voltages -- 6. Ultra-Low-Power Design: Sub-Threshold Operation -- 7. Leakage Power (I) -- 8. Leakage Power (II) -- 9. Threshold Voltage Selection -- 10. Variation Aware Design -- 11. Sources of Variability: Overview -- 12. Sensitivity at Different Operating Conditions: Voltage Scaling Introduces Uncertainties -- 13. Global Yield Optimization -- 14. Adaptive Tuning: Basic Principle -- 15. Body Bias Modulates Threshold Voltage -- 16. Body Bias for Leakage Reduction -- 17. Body Bias in FD-SOI Technologies -- 18. Adaptive Tuning: Basic Principle (I) -- 19. Adaptive Tuning: Basic Principle (II) -- 20. Electrical Knobs: Adaptive Body Bias
Control code
1049914126
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (306 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9788793609822
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1049914126
Label
Power management for internet of everything, editors Mathieu Coustans, Catherine Dehollain
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover -- Half Title Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of contents -- Introduction -- Chapter 1- Applications in Biosensing of Power Delivery, by Sandro Carrara -- 1. Chips under the skin? -- 2. CommentFully-Connected Human++ -- 3. Wearable Devices by 2020 -- 4. Under-the-Skin Device & Wearable Patch -- 5. Under-the-Skin Device (I) -- 6. Under-the-Skin Device (II) -- 7. The electrochemical Cell -- 8. How to measure a redox reaction? -- 9. Control Amplifier @ RE -- 10. Risk of Saturation (I) -- 11. Risk of Saturation (II) -- 12. Faradaic Current @ Fixed Bias -- 13. Faradaic Current in Voltage Scan -- 14. Transimpedance Amplifier @ WER -- 15. Grounded Working -- 16. Inside the Cell: Faradaic Current -- 17. Outline -- 18. The challenges were ... -- 19. Multi-Panel Platforms for Metabolism Monitoring (I) -- 20. Oxidases for Markers Monitoring -- 21. Multi-Panel Platforms for Metabolism Monitoring (II) -- 22. Indirect Detection: e.g., the ATP -- 23. Multi-Panel Platforms for Metabolism Monitoring (III) -- 24. P450 for Drugs Monitoring -- 25. Breast cancer drugs cocktail -- 26. Multi-Platform design -- 27. Multiple Calibration Curves -- 28. Sensors Query in Time -- 29. Multi-Panel Platforms for Metabolism Monitoring -- 30. Response upon ionic changes -- 31. The challenges were ... -- 32. Problems on Detection Limits -- 33. An improved P450/Electrode coupling by using Carbon Nanotubes -- 34. Improved Detection Limit -- 35. Detection of Several Drugs -- 36. Nano-Bio-Sensors by drop-casting -- 37. Nano-Bio-Sensors by Micro-Spotting -- 38. Nano-Bio-Sensors by Electrodeposition -- 39. Nano-Bio-Sensors by CVD (I) -- 40. Nano-Bio-Sensors by CVD (II) -- 41. Four different techniques -- 42. Template-free Pt electrodepositions -- 43. Nanopetal-decorated Nanospheres -- 44. Direct Detection of Glucose
  • 45. Non-Enzymatic Glucose detection (in cell media!) -- 46. Response upon ionic changes (I) -- 47. Response upon ionic changes (II) -- 48. Validation with Cells: Osmotic Shock -- 49. Validation with Cells: Apoptosis -- 50. The challenges were ... -- 51. Reliability in Temperature & pH (I) -- 52. Reliability in Temperature & pH (II) -- 53. Resistance-to-pulse-width converter -- 54. The CMOS reader for Potentiometry -- 55. The challenges were ... -- 56. Energy Scavenging Strategies -- 57. Inductive Coupling -- 58. Measures on the Designed Inductors -- 59. The Tiny Spiral Inductors -- 60. The Tiny Spiral Inductors on Air -- 61. The Multi-layer Inductor on Tissue -- 62. The Realized Remote Powering Patch (I) -- 63. The Realized Remote Powering Patch (II) -- 64. The Android Interface (I) -- 65. The Android Interface (II) -- 66. Connectivity with Smart-Watch -- 67. Connectivity through Cloud -- 68. The challenges were ... -- 69. Implantable Chip -Fully Integration -- 70. IC interfaced to the passive platform -- 71. A reliable CMOS Frontend -- 72. The Chip Frontend -- 2nd prototype -- 73. The Chip Frontend -- 3rd prototype (I) -- 74. The Chip Frontend -- 3rd prototype (II) -- 75. Implantable Systems-In-Package -- 76. The IC Potentiostat (I) -- 77. The IC Potentiostat (II) -- 78. Biocompatible Packaging -- 79. Final Silicone Packaging -- 80. System Biocompatibility -- 81. The Approach for moving animals -- 82. Remote Monitoring in Translational Medicine (I) -- 83. Remote Monitoring in Translational Medicine (II) -- 84. Under the skin system -- 85. Endogenous in-vivo -- 86. Exogenous in-vivo -- 87. Power Supply continuity issue -- 88. Endogenous in-vitro -- 89. Exogenous in-vitro -- 90. Nano-Sensors on Integrated Circuits -- 91. A certain attention from international media -- 92. Under the skin for body sculpting -- 93. Enhancing human being
  • 94. Size and Shape to be injectable as a Needle? -- 95. Reveal LINQTM by Medtronic -- 96. Conclusions -- 97. Take home main message -- 98. Further Reading -- 99. Great thank to my team @ EPFL -- Chapter 2 -- Optimization of the Transfer of Power and of the Data Communication in the Case of Remotely Powered Sensor Networks, by Catherine Dehollain -- 1. Content -- PART 1 -- 2. ARCHITECTURES OF REMOTELY POWERED SENSOR NETWORKS -- 3. At the Boundary between Different Domains -- 4. Data Transfer Methods -- 5. Backscattering Modulation in far field -- 6. Load Modulation in near field -- 7. Wireless Active Transmitter -- 8. Wireless Remote Powering -- 9. Single Frequency for Power and Data -- 10. Dual Frequency for Power and Data -- 11. Knee Prosthesis Monitoring -- 12. Ultrasonic Powering and Data Communication -- 13. Digestive Track Diagnostic -- 14. Passive Memory Tag for High Data Rate -- 15. Magnetically-Coupled Remote Powering System for Freely Moving Animals -- 16. Specs for Freely Moving Laboratory Rodents -- 17. Implantable Bio-Monitoring System -- 18. Thermistor Response Curve -- 19. Low-power Implantable Chip -- 20. Local Temperature Sensing Chip -- 21. Time-domain Sensor Readout -- 22. Implemented Data Transmitter -- 23. Wireless Power and Data Transfer for Intracranial Epilepsy Monitoring -- 24. Drawbacks of Intracranial Neural Implants -- 25. Wireless Power and Data Transfer System -- 26. Power and Data for Epilepsy Monitoring -- 27. Far-Field Remotely Powered Wireless Sensor System -- 28. Adaptive Impedance Matching -- 29. CMOS Differential Rectifier -- 30. Passive UHF RFID Tag -- 31. Base Station and Tag Antennas -- 32. CMOS Differential Rectifier -- 33. Low Power Sensor Interface -- PART 2 -- 34. PASSIVE TRANSMITTERS THANKS TO BACKSCATTERING DATA COMMUNICATION -- 35. Backscattering Data Communication
  • 36. Implementation of the Data Communication -- 37. IF Backscattering Data Communication -- 38. Modulation Types -- 39. Read Range of Far Field RFID Systems -- 40. Effective Radar Cross Section -- 41. Estimation of the Maximum Distance Range -- 42. Parameters of the Tag and of the Reader -- 43. Measurements compared to Model -- 44. Radio Regulations -- 45. Passive Memory Tag -- 46. Dual Frequency Passive Memory Tag -- PART 3 -- 47. REMOTE POWER FORWIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS -- 48. Power by Electro-Magnetic Coupling -- 49. Remote Powering of an Implant -- 50. Geometry of the Coils -- 51. Comparison of the Two Types of Coupling -- 52. Solution 1: Fixed External Coils -- 53. Power Management of the Power Amplifiers -- 54. Solution 2: Moving External Coil -- 55. Solution 3: External Coil around the Cage -- 56. Conclusion -- Chapter 3 -- A System on Chip for Energy Harvesting and Wireless Power Transfer, by Roberto La Rosa -- 1. Presentation Outline -- 2. Impact of Energy Harvesting and WPT on IoT -- 3. WPT and Energy Harvesting Solutions -- 4. A Self-Powered RF IC for Energy Harvesting -- 5. Nulling Stand-by using Wireless Power Transfer -- 6. Nulling Stand-by in battery powered appliances -- 7. Quasi Nulling Stand-by in battery powered appliances -- 8. Nulling Stand-by in battery powered appliances -- 9. Quasi Nulling Stand-by in battery powered appliances -- 10. Nulling Stand-By in Europe would imply: -- 11. Nulling Stand-by in AC powered appliances -- 12. Over the distance Wireless Battery Charger -- 13. Powering Battery-Free Systems with WPT -- 14. Powering Battery-Free Systems with WPT -- 15. Powering Battery-Free Systems with WPT -- 16. Powering Battery-Free Systems with PV cell -- 17. Conclusions -- Chapter 4 -- Measuring and Analyzing Dynamic Current Profiles in Low Power Applications, by Dr. Christoph Zysset -- 1. Low Power Applications
  • 2. Current in Low Power Applications -- 3. Dynamic Currents in Low Power Apps (I) -- 4. Dynamic Currents in Low Power Apps (II) -- 5. Popular Measurement Approach -- 6. Current Measurement (I) -- 7. Current Measurement (II) -- 8. Current Measurement (III) -- 9. Gap-free Recording -- 10. Gap-free Recording -- Dead Time -- 11. Battery Emulation -- 12. So is there a solution? -- 13. Two approaches -- 14. DC Power Analyzer -- Dynamic Range -- 15. DC Power Analyzer -- Battery Emulation -- 16. DC Power Analyzer -- Gap-free Recording -- 17. DC Power Analyzer -- 18. Device Current Waveform Analyzer (I) -- 19. Device Current Waveform Analyzer (II) -- 20. Device Current Waveform Analyzer (III) -- 21. Measuring Dynamic Current Profiles in Low Power Applications is Not Trivial -- 22. There are solutions to this kind of measurement tasks -- Chapter 5 -- Challenges and Approached to Variation-Aware Digital Low Power VLSI Design for IoT, by Prof. Andreas Burg -- 1. Low Power Digital VLSI Design -- 2. Power Consumption Bottleneck -- 3. Power and Energy Consumption in CMOS -- 4. Voltage Scaling: The Hammer in the Toolbox of Every Low-Power Designer -- 5. Compensating for Frequency Loss at Scaled Voltages -- 6. Ultra-Low-Power Design: Sub-Threshold Operation -- 7. Leakage Power (I) -- 8. Leakage Power (II) -- 9. Threshold Voltage Selection -- 10. Variation Aware Design -- 11. Sources of Variability: Overview -- 12. Sensitivity at Different Operating Conditions: Voltage Scaling Introduces Uncertainties -- 13. Global Yield Optimization -- 14. Adaptive Tuning: Basic Principle -- 15. Body Bias Modulates Threshold Voltage -- 16. Body Bias for Leakage Reduction -- 17. Body Bias in FD-SOI Technologies -- 18. Adaptive Tuning: Basic Principle (I) -- 19. Adaptive Tuning: Basic Principle (II) -- 20. Electrical Knobs: Adaptive Body Bias
Control code
1049914126
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (306 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9788793609822
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1049914126

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