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The Resource Practical LTE Based Security Forces PMR Networks, (electronic resource)

Practical LTE Based Security Forces PMR Networks, (electronic resource)

Label
Practical LTE Based Security Forces PMR Networks
Title
Practical LTE Based Security Forces PMR Networks
Creator
Contributor
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
NhCcYBP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Henry-Labordere, A
Dewey number
005.8
Index
no index present
LC call number
TK5102.85 .H467 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
ProQuest (Firm)
Series statement
River Publishers Series in Security and Digital Forensics Ser
Label
Practical LTE Based Security Forces PMR Networks, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Description based upon print version of record
  • 4.1 Classical UICC, eUICC M2M, or eUICC "consumer" SIM cards
Contents
  • PMR tactical networks' federation
  • Explanation of the remote provisioning figure
  • 4.3.
  • eUICC and UICC profile switching methods
  • 4.3.1.
  • Add IMSI with its own security domain in UICC by OTA
  • 4.3.1.1.
  • Logical organization of a multi-security domain UICC SIM card
  • 4.3.1.2.
  • Add a new IMSI with its own security domain
  • 4.3.1.3.
  • 2.2.1.
  • Summary of the applet management commands
  • 4.3.2.
  • Updating the OTA security keys KiC and Kid in multi-IMSI UICC cards
  • 4.4.
  • Is it possible to reduce the automatic network switching time VPLMN [ї́ѫ] HPLMN?
  • 4.4.1.
  • TS 23.122 3GPP standard
  • 4.4.1.1.
  • Automatic network selection mode procedure
  • 4.4.1.2.
  • Operational needs' summary
  • (In VPLMN) automatic and manual network selection modes
  • 4.4.1.3.
  • Reducing the timer T
  • 4.5.
  • OTA provisioning of the SIM: "card initiated OTA SIM with IP" or "network initiated" using SMS
  • 4.5.1.
  • OTA SIM over IP
  • 4.5.1.1.
  • Legacy network initiated
  • 4.5.1.2.
  • 2.2.2.
  • Card initiated
  • 4.5.2.
  • Card initiated mode with a data connection to the OTA IP server
  • 4.5.2.1.
  • BIP/CAT-TP
  • 4.5.2.2.
  • OTA over https
  • 4.5.3.
  • Network initiated SMS triggering of a SIM IP connection (BIP/CAT-TP or https) to the OTA server
  • 4.5.4.
  • Radio planning and IP addressing of the various federated tactical networks
  • GSMa SP02 v3.2
  • 4.6.
  • Profile update of the security domain and protection against the cloning of a stolen SIM
  • 4.7.
  • Application provisioning in the device (not in the SIM card)
  • 4.8.
  • Is being a full MVNO justified for an autonomous car manufacturer?
  • 4.8.1.
  • Current high latency connected applications from the car to the manufacturer
  • 4.8.2.
  • 2.2.3.
  • next big thing: Autonomous vehicle with sensors
  • 4.8.3.
  • Data trafic costs comparison between local IMSI and full MVNO
  • 4.8.4.
  • Security discussion: Local IMSI compared to own IMSI as a full MVNO
  • 4.8.5.
  • Supplementary features provided by the full MVNO model
  • 4.8.6.
  • Minimum setup for a car manufacturer to manage their SDVIs: OTA-IP server
  • 4.8.6.1.
  • Radio planning for mobility between tactical bubbles of a federation: Requirements and solution
  • Need to have its own OTA server for its own management of the SIMs and the SW updates
  • 4.8.6.2.
  • Consequence: The card manufacturer must be a full MVNO
  • 4.8.6.3.
  • Summary table of the 2018 solutions for car manufacturers
  • References
  • 5.
  • Group Communication Provisioning by OTA, SMS 4G, and SMS IMS
  • 5.1.
  • Operational need for OTA provisioning in PMR networks
  • 2.2.4.
  • 5.2.
  • SMS service convergence 2G, 3G, 4G, SIP, and SMPP in other non-PMR cases
  • 5.3.
  • SMS in the EUTRAN 4G domain
  • 5.4.
  • SMS procedure to handle destinations in 4G networks
  • 5.4.1.
  • SMS procedure and call flow
  • 5.4.2.
  • Virtualized type 1 implementation example
  • Initial configuration of a user to associate with its assigned group
  • 5.4.3.
  • HLR-HSS interrogation with MAP/SS7 (3GPP TS 29.002)
  • 5.4.4.
  • HLR-HSS interrogation with S6c/diameter (3GPP TS 29.338)
  • 5.4.5.
  • SIP registration in the SM-IP-GW to receive SMS with SIP MESSAGES
  • 5.4.5.1.
  • Standard 3GP registration for SIP message reception
  • 5.4.5.2.
  • MAP traces for ANY-TIME-MODMCATION IP-SM-GW [ї́ѫ] HLR-HSS
  • 2.3.
  • 5.4.5.3.
  • Standard 3GP deregistration for SIP message reception
  • 5.4.5.4.
  • Registration of the reachability for SMS in the IP-SM-GW with Map Note Subscriber Data Modified
  • 5.4.5.5.
  • Simpler registration for SIP message reception (recommended)
  • 5.5.
  • Detailed procedure for SMS-MT and SMS-MO single segment
  • 5.5.1.
  • SMS-MT
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Federation method for N---1 concurrent networks with one taking the central role
  • 5.5.2.
  • SMS-MO
  • 5.6.
  • Long SMS with segmentation
  • 5.6.1.
  • Long SMS-MT from 3G to a 4G coverage handset
  • 5.6.2.
  • 4G resends (SMS-MO) the long SMS received from the 3G
  • 5.7.
  • Application to OTA SIM in pure PMR 4G networks
  • 2.3.1.
  • 5.8.
  • Mobile and fixed number portability with Dx/diameter to send SMS to IMS networks
  • 5.8.1.
  • LIR/Cx/diameter is the equivalent IMS of a legacy 3G MAP SEND-ROUTING JNFO req
  • 5.8.2.
  • Principle of the use of the location-information-request/Cx diameter to resolve the portability
  • 5.8.3.
  • Fixed [ї́ѫ] mobile portability
  • 5.8.4.
  • How to implement the portability of a number in the ported-out network
  • Architecture description
  • 5.9.
  • 3G [ї́ؤ] SIP MMS interworking
  • 5.9.1.
  • SIP receiving of 3G MMS
  • 5.9.2.
  • Sending an MMS from the SIP client to a 3G UE
  • References
  • 6.
  • Multicast: MCPTT PMR, MOOC Teaching, and TV in Local Loop Networks (RTTH)
  • 6.1.
  • 2.4.
  • Operational need for multicast in PMR networks
  • 6.2.
  • Triple play, the need for multicast TV and massive open online course (MOOC)
  • 6.3.
  • Quantitative elementary modeling of the fiber vs 4G local loop choice
  • 6.3.1.
  • Average distance center - household with fibering
  • 6.3.2.
  • Cost model for the fibering solution to the home (FTTH) vs 4G Radio (RTTH)
  • 6.4.
  • Using the multicast for MCPTT and federating MBFSN areas
  • 3GPP multicast architecture
  • 6.5.
  • Detailed call flow of an MBMS session
  • 6.5.1.
  • Overall call flow
  • 6.5.2.
  • M3/diameter messages MCE [ї́ѫ] MME: Role of the MCE
  • 6.5.3.
  • M2/diameter messages eNodeB H MCE
  • 6.5.4.
  • 2.4.1.
  • "Joining" (MBMS multicast activation by the user) GC1 UE [ї́ѫ] application server
  • 6.6.
  • Centralized or distributed multicast coordination entity (MCE)
  • 6.7.
  • MBMS delivery and eMBMS-capable device stack
  • 6.7.1.
  • Group communication delivery appeared in [6.7Rel 13]
  • 6.7.2.
  • Transparent delivery appeared in [6.7 Rel 14] and other modes
  • 6.8.
  • Introduction to eMBMS
  • Interoperability: Intergroup and interagency communication
  • 6.9.
  • Architecture with virtual machines --
  • 2.4.1.1.
  • Broadcast mode
  • 2.4.1.2.
  • 1.
  • Multicast mode
  • 2.4.2.
  • Attachment of a tactical network in an existing federation: GCS AS-centric architecture
  • 2.5.
  • MBMS extension of the radio coverage of the new joining tactical network
  • 2.5.1.
  • Crude basic federation (cross-copying) active service to another service area
  • 2.5.2.
  • Federated MCEs or central MCE?
  • 2.5.2.1.
  • Introduction
  • MBMS LTE channels
  • 2.5.2.2.
  • Meaning of "MBMS synchronization," role of the central or coordinated MCE
  • 2.5.2.3.
  • Behavior of an MBMS-enabled UE
  • 2.5.2.4.
  • Optimization of the MBMS channel allocation between federated groups
  • 2.5.2.5.
  • Meaning of MBMS synchronization, role of the MCE
  • 2.6.
  • 2.
  • Overview of a PMR or local loop network architecture: Inclusion of direct calls' support
  • 2.6.1.
  • PMR HLR-HSS capabilities and architecture
  • 2.6.2.
  • Proximity services (ProSe)
  • References
  • 3.
  • Geo-Localization of PMR Group Members and Monitoring of the Quality of Service with the ECID Method
  • 3.1.
  • Operational need for a geo-localization service in PMR networks
  • LTE PMR Networks: Service, Seamless Federation of Tactical Networks, Backup by the Public Operators' Coverage, and Direct Calls
  • 3.2.
  • Localization methods in tactical networks
  • 3.2.1.
  • Enabling the LPP protocol in the UEs
  • 3.2.2.
  • Using SUPL as main geo-localization protocol
  • 3.3.
  • ECID positioning method (LPP control plane) using a graphic interface
  • 3.4.
  • Cell database for the ECID method yielding the UE received signal level
  • 2.1.
  • 3.5.
  • Why not use GPS positioning method (LPP control plane)?
  • 3.6.
  • ECID method: Calculation of the physical measures from the measurements received from the UE
  • 3.6.1.
  • RSRP measurement [ї́ѫ] Dbm values for signal level at the UE
  • 3.6.2.
  • UE Rx-Tx [ї́ѫ] distance estimate between UE and eNodeB
  • 3.6.3.
  • Field results and coverage comparisons between various eNodeBs
  • PMR tactical network elements
  • 3.6.4.
  • Operational use and presentation of the ECID method results in PMR tactical networks
  • References
  • 4.
  • Choice of the SIM Card Type for PMR or M2M Networks and Automatic Profile Switching Possibilities
  • 4.1.
  • Classical UICC, eUICC M2M, or eUICC "consumer" SIM cards
  • 4.1.1.
  • Usage difference
  • 4.1.2.
  • 2.2.
  • Difference of logical structure between UICC and eUICC
  • 4.1.2.1.
  • eUICC
  • 4.1.2.2.
  • UICC
  • 4.1.2.3.
  • Recent file additions for all card types
  • 4.2.
  • Remote provisioning system for eUICC (M2M and consumer)
  • 4.2.1.
  • 7.3.
  • Reminder of the VoTT architecture for a pure VoIP MNO
  • 7.3.1.
  • Public identity for VoTT VoIP vs LTE
  • 7.3.2.
  • VoTT VoIP network architecture
  • 7.4.
  • IMS-based PMR network architecture for the services
  • 7.4.1.
  • Equivalence between 3G/2G notions, VoLTE/IMS, WiFi EAPsiim/VoTT, and SIP VoTT
  • 7.4.2.
  • Equivalence between 3G/4G notions and the equivalent in IMS (mobility management of Cx/diameter)
  • 7.4.3.
  • Incoming call (protocol Cx/diameter)
  • 7.4.4.
  • IMS subscriber's services' management (protocol Sh/diameter)
  • 7.5.
  • Call flow of the IMS services
  • 7.5.1.
  • IMS registration: Voice calls
  • References
  • 7.5.1.1.
  • Authentication of the subscriber, VoLTE and OTT VoIP compatible core IMS: MAR and MAA/Cx messages
  • 7.5.1.2.
  • Registration in the HSS to be able to receive calls and SMS
  • 7.5.1.3.
  • De-registration of a subscriber
  • 7.5.2.
  • Handling of incoming calls or SMS from the PSTSN or the SS7 network
  • 7.5.2.1.
  • Emergency call handling in IMS with calling party localization
  • 7.
  • 7.5.2.2.
  • SMS
  • 7.5.2.3.
  • Charging of the calls and SMS
  • 7.5.3.
  • Outgoing SMS or voice calls to the SS7 network or the PSTN --
  • Integration of IMS and VoLTE in the PMR Networks and the MNOs, Details on the PCC Processing, and Access Using a Non-trusted WLAN (WiFi with an ePDG)
  • 7.1.
  • WiFi and V6LTE4G access to a PMR central core network
  • 7.2.
  • Operational need for VoLTE in PMR networks
  • Anti-tromboning of the calls to mobiles 3G: The SORTA method [7.16] passive camel monitoring and MAP call transfer package
  • Join server (equivalent of an HLR for just the authentication function)
  • 9.4.1.6.
  • Application server
  • 9.4.1.7.
  • Packet transmission
  • 9.4.2.
  • Device classes
  • 9.4.3.
  • Device addressing, LoRa roaming, and LoRa hubs
  • 9.5.
  • 7.5.4.1.
  • LoRa virtual roaming hubs
  • 9.5.1.
  • Architecture principles
  • 9.5.2.
  • Setups between a LoRa hub operator and visited LoRa network partners
  • 9.5.3.
  • Detailed explanation of the LoRa hub operation
  • 9.5.3.1.
  • Commercial aims: No agreement between the visited and home LoRa networks, one-stop shopping with the LoRa hub operator
  • 9.5.3.2.
  • general tromboning for outgoing calls to 3G with conditional forwarding of unsuccessful calls
  • Explanation of the control plane call flow
  • 9.5.3.3.
  • User data call flow for a LoRa hub
  • 9.5.4.
  • Geo-localization in LoRa and applications: TDOA is the most appropriate method
  • References
  • 10.
  • Advanced Policy Control and Charging (PCC), Standard Provisioning Architecture for HLR-HSS and PCRF
  • 10.1.
  • Destination IP-dependent charging with an external DPI (deep packet inspection)
  • 7.5.4.2.
  • 10.1.1.
  • Architecture consequence to satisfy the rerouting requirement
  • 10.1.2.
  • Rating plan-dependent charging
  • 10.1.3.
  • Data charging diagram
  • 10.1.4.
  • Slow-down policing with an external DPI
  • 10.1.4.1.
  • Gx-based slow-down policing implementation in the DPI
  • Anti-tromboning #1, 3GPP MAP method, not applicable in practice
  • 10.1.4.2.
  • Rx-Based slow-down policing implementation in the DPI
  • 10.1.5.
  • Traces for the charging by an external DPI
  • 10.1.5.1.
  • Data provided by the GGSN-PGW which may be used for charging
  • 10.1.5.2.
  • RADIUS interface between GGSN-PGW and PCEF-DPI (which is the radius server)
  • 10.1.5.3.
  • Content of the RADIUS accounting-request (start) received by the PCEF-DPI
  • 7.5.4.3.
  • 10.1.5.4.
  • Content of the RADIUS accounting-request (stop) receive by the PCEF-DPI
  • 10.2.
  • Standard 3GPP user data provisioning: LDAP and SOAP
  • 10.2.1.
  • 3GPP user data repository architecture
  • References
  • 11.
  • Appendix: Detailed Traces for the Different Chapters
  • 11.1.
  • Anti-tromboning # 2, pure ISUP handling by the GMSC-IMS: Simple but not quite general
  • Triggering the IP connection of the SIM IP to the OTA-IP server
  • 11.1.1.
  • OTA-IP configuration of the SIM for TCP (HTTPs) for UDP (BIP/CAT-TP)
  • 11.1.2.
  • Triggering the OTA-IP connection from the "applet for OTA pull" or with an SMS-MT
  • 11.1.3.
  • Details of the SMS-MT to network initiate a forced BIP/CAT-TP (IP UDP connection to the OTA server while the SIM configuration is IP TCP (HTTPs)
  • 11.1.3.1.
  • Coding of the SMS-MT payload (ETSI TS 223 to open the BIP and CAT-TP channels
  • 11.1.3.2.
  • 7.5.4.4.
  • SMS-MT parameters details (TS 23.040)
  • 11.1.3.3.
  • Opening of the IP channel by the SIM card
  • 11.1.3.4.
  • Confirmation of the reception of triggering SMS-MT by the SIM and of the establishment of the IP UDP channel to the OTA IP server
  • 11.1.3.5.
  • OTA-IP sequence of commands (read IMSI)
  • 11.1.3.6.
  • SMS-MO received by the OTA server with the PoR
  • 11.1.3.7.
  • Anti-tromboning # 3, the SORTA method [7.16]: CAMEL and use of MAP Resume Call Handling By A Camel Handling SCP: Rigorous
  • Completion and closing of the OTA-IP session
  • 11.2.
  • SMS-MT with diameter SMSC [ї́ѫ] UE
  • 11.2.1.
  • SMS-MO with diameter UE [ї́ѫ] SMSC
  • 11.3.
  • Multicast: Traces M2AP, M3AP, Sgmb, and GTP V2
  • 11.3.1.
  • M2 SETUP request eNodeB [ї́ѫ] MCE
  • 11.3.2.
  • 7.5.4.5.
  • M3 SETUP request MCE [ї́ѫ] MME
  • 11.3.3.
  • M3 SETUP response MME [ї́ѫ] MCE
  • 11.3.4.
  • M2 SETUP response MCE [ї́ѫ] NodeB
  • 11.3.5.
  • Sgmb RAR BM-SC [ї́ѫ] MBMS GW
  • 11.3.6.
  • GTPV2 MBMS session start request MBMS GW [ї́ѫ] MME
  • 11.3.7.
  • Contents note continued:
  • Trace details CAMEL and MAP of the SORTA anti-tromboning
  • SGmb RAA MBMS GW [ї́ѫ] BM-SC
  • 11.3.8.
  • M3 MBMS session start request MME [ї́ѫ] MCE
  • 11.3.9.
  • M3 MBMS session start response MCE [ї́ѫ] MME
  • 11.3.10.
  • GTPV2 MBMS session start response MME H MBMS GW
  • 11.4.
  • Traces IoT
  • 11.4.1.
  • 7.6.
  • Subscriber information request (SIR) and answer (SIA) MTC-IWF [ї́ѫ] HSS S6m/diameter
  • 11.4.2.
  • Devices trigger request (DTR) and answer (DTA) MTC-IWF [ї́ѫ] SMSC T4/diameter
  • 11.4.3.
  • Transfer forward request (TFR) and answer (TFA) SMSC [ї́ѫ] MME Sgd/diameter (SMS-MT)
  • 11.4.3.1.
  • Uplink NAS transport request MME [ї́ѫ] UE and downlink NAS transport UE [ї́ѫ] MME
  • 11.4.4.
  • Delivery report request (DRR) and answer (DRA) SMSC [ї́ѫ] MTC-IWF T4/diameter
  • 11.5.
  • What brings VoLTE, interest of IMS for the combined mobile-fixed service
  • Traces of a recursive DNS request
  • 12.
  • Conclusion: Full LTE for Security Forces, When?
  • References
  • 7.7.
  • Roaming VoLTE with local break out
  • 7.8.
  • Traces of user data (subscriber profile) in a server assignment answer (SAA/Cx)
  • 7.9.
  • IMS files and certificates in the SIM card
  • 7.9.1.
  • 7.5.3.1.
  • IMS files in an ISIM card
  • 7.9.2.
  • SIM files with the root certificate
  • 7.10.
  • QoS parameter mapping GTPv2 [ї́ѳ] Gx [ї́ѳ] Rx [ї́ѳ] application function
  • 7.10.1.
  • Dedicated bearer creation, traces Rx and Gx
  • 7.10.2.
  • PCRF processing: Correspondences between the GTPv2 parameters and the AVPs Gx et Rx
  • 7.11.
  • SMS
  • Access through a non-trusted WLAN (WiFi) to the PMR core networking
  • 7.11.1.
  • Operational interest
  • 7.11.2.
  • Call flow to establish the IPsec tunnel and localize a WiFi UE in the HLR-HSS
  • References
  • 8.
  • Lawful Interception 3GPP Architecture and PMR Network Case
  • 8.1.
  • Legal interception applied to PMR networks: Use for monitoring and security
  • 7.5.3.2.
  • 8.2.
  • LI standard 3GPP architecture
  • 8.2.1.
  • Proprietary interfaces of the network equipment and standardization
  • 8.2.2.
  • LI management notification operation (HI 1 interface)
  • 8.2.3.
  • HI2: Handover interface port 2 (ASN1 coding)
  • 8.2.4.
  • HI3: Handover interface port 3
  • Charging
  • 8.3.
  • Services concerned by the interception need
  • 8.4.
  • Practical use of the content interception HI3 or X3
  • 8.4.1.
  • Use of metadata
  • 8.4.2.
  • Non-judiciary interception methods of security agencies
  • References
  • 9.
  • 7.5.3.3.
  • Diameter-Based M2M (LTE-M and NB-IoT) 3GPP Services and LoRa
  • 9.1.
  • Operational need for M2M in PMR networks
  • 9.2.
  • 3GPP NB-IOT type of services between the AS IoT server and the M2M devices: Direct, indirect, and hybrid model implementations
  • 9.3.
  • Necessary additional diameter protocols in an "IoT ready" EPC for the "indirect model"
  • 9.3.1.
  • T4 interface from the application IoT to the MTC-IWF and then to the SMSC
  • 9.3.2.
  • 3G Voice calls to a subscriber in a mobile network: Non-IMS case
  • S6m and S6t interfaces with the HLR-HSS TS 29.336
  • 9.3.3.
  • T6a and T6b interfaces between MME or SGSN and MTC-IWF TS 29.128
  • 9.3.4.
  • Tsp interface between the SCS and the MTC-IWF (TS 29.368)
  • 9.3.5.
  • Implementation strategy, what is the simplest and most general implementation for IoT
  • 9.4.
  • LoRa
  • 9.4.1.
  • 7.5.4.
  • LoRaWAN architecture
  • 9.4.1.1.
  • End-device (equivalent of combined UE +SIM card)
  • 9.4.1.2.
  • Radio gateway (equivalent of an RNC 3G)
  • 9.4.1.3.
  • Network server (equivalent of SGSN 3G (no GGSN equivalent used))
  • 9.4.1.4.
  • Central DNS of the LoRa alliance
  • 9.4.1.5.
Control code
MSTDDA5528846
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource ( 356 p..):
Form of item
online
Isbn
9788793609785
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Practical LTE Based Security Forces PMR Networks, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
  • Description based upon print version of record
  • 4.1 Classical UICC, eUICC M2M, or eUICC "consumer" SIM cards
Contents
  • PMR tactical networks' federation
  • Explanation of the remote provisioning figure
  • 4.3.
  • eUICC and UICC profile switching methods
  • 4.3.1.
  • Add IMSI with its own security domain in UICC by OTA
  • 4.3.1.1.
  • Logical organization of a multi-security domain UICC SIM card
  • 4.3.1.2.
  • Add a new IMSI with its own security domain
  • 4.3.1.3.
  • 2.2.1.
  • Summary of the applet management commands
  • 4.3.2.
  • Updating the OTA security keys KiC and Kid in multi-IMSI UICC cards
  • 4.4.
  • Is it possible to reduce the automatic network switching time VPLMN [ї́ѫ] HPLMN?
  • 4.4.1.
  • TS 23.122 3GPP standard
  • 4.4.1.1.
  • Automatic network selection mode procedure
  • 4.4.1.2.
  • Operational needs' summary
  • (In VPLMN) automatic and manual network selection modes
  • 4.4.1.3.
  • Reducing the timer T
  • 4.5.
  • OTA provisioning of the SIM: "card initiated OTA SIM with IP" or "network initiated" using SMS
  • 4.5.1.
  • OTA SIM over IP
  • 4.5.1.1.
  • Legacy network initiated
  • 4.5.1.2.
  • 2.2.2.
  • Card initiated
  • 4.5.2.
  • Card initiated mode with a data connection to the OTA IP server
  • 4.5.2.1.
  • BIP/CAT-TP
  • 4.5.2.2.
  • OTA over https
  • 4.5.3.
  • Network initiated SMS triggering of a SIM IP connection (BIP/CAT-TP or https) to the OTA server
  • 4.5.4.
  • Radio planning and IP addressing of the various federated tactical networks
  • GSMa SP02 v3.2
  • 4.6.
  • Profile update of the security domain and protection against the cloning of a stolen SIM
  • 4.7.
  • Application provisioning in the device (not in the SIM card)
  • 4.8.
  • Is being a full MVNO justified for an autonomous car manufacturer?
  • 4.8.1.
  • Current high latency connected applications from the car to the manufacturer
  • 4.8.2.
  • 2.2.3.
  • next big thing: Autonomous vehicle with sensors
  • 4.8.3.
  • Data trafic costs comparison between local IMSI and full MVNO
  • 4.8.4.
  • Security discussion: Local IMSI compared to own IMSI as a full MVNO
  • 4.8.5.
  • Supplementary features provided by the full MVNO model
  • 4.8.6.
  • Minimum setup for a car manufacturer to manage their SDVIs: OTA-IP server
  • 4.8.6.1.
  • Radio planning for mobility between tactical bubbles of a federation: Requirements and solution
  • Need to have its own OTA server for its own management of the SIMs and the SW updates
  • 4.8.6.2.
  • Consequence: The card manufacturer must be a full MVNO
  • 4.8.6.3.
  • Summary table of the 2018 solutions for car manufacturers
  • References
  • 5.
  • Group Communication Provisioning by OTA, SMS 4G, and SMS IMS
  • 5.1.
  • Operational need for OTA provisioning in PMR networks
  • 2.2.4.
  • 5.2.
  • SMS service convergence 2G, 3G, 4G, SIP, and SMPP in other non-PMR cases
  • 5.3.
  • SMS in the EUTRAN 4G domain
  • 5.4.
  • SMS procedure to handle destinations in 4G networks
  • 5.4.1.
  • SMS procedure and call flow
  • 5.4.2.
  • Virtualized type 1 implementation example
  • Initial configuration of a user to associate with its assigned group
  • 5.4.3.
  • HLR-HSS interrogation with MAP/SS7 (3GPP TS 29.002)
  • 5.4.4.
  • HLR-HSS interrogation with S6c/diameter (3GPP TS 29.338)
  • 5.4.5.
  • SIP registration in the SM-IP-GW to receive SMS with SIP MESSAGES
  • 5.4.5.1.
  • Standard 3GP registration for SIP message reception
  • 5.4.5.2.
  • MAP traces for ANY-TIME-MODMCATION IP-SM-GW [ї́ѫ] HLR-HSS
  • 2.3.
  • 5.4.5.3.
  • Standard 3GP deregistration for SIP message reception
  • 5.4.5.4.
  • Registration of the reachability for SMS in the IP-SM-GW with Map Note Subscriber Data Modified
  • 5.4.5.5.
  • Simpler registration for SIP message reception (recommended)
  • 5.5.
  • Detailed procedure for SMS-MT and SMS-MO single segment
  • 5.5.1.
  • SMS-MT
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Federation method for N---1 concurrent networks with one taking the central role
  • 5.5.2.
  • SMS-MO
  • 5.6.
  • Long SMS with segmentation
  • 5.6.1.
  • Long SMS-MT from 3G to a 4G coverage handset
  • 5.6.2.
  • 4G resends (SMS-MO) the long SMS received from the 3G
  • 5.7.
  • Application to OTA SIM in pure PMR 4G networks
  • 2.3.1.
  • 5.8.
  • Mobile and fixed number portability with Dx/diameter to send SMS to IMS networks
  • 5.8.1.
  • LIR/Cx/diameter is the equivalent IMS of a legacy 3G MAP SEND-ROUTING JNFO req
  • 5.8.2.
  • Principle of the use of the location-information-request/Cx diameter to resolve the portability
  • 5.8.3.
  • Fixed [ї́ѫ] mobile portability
  • 5.8.4.
  • How to implement the portability of a number in the ported-out network
  • Architecture description
  • 5.9.
  • 3G [ї́ؤ] SIP MMS interworking
  • 5.9.1.
  • SIP receiving of 3G MMS
  • 5.9.2.
  • Sending an MMS from the SIP client to a 3G UE
  • References
  • 6.
  • Multicast: MCPTT PMR, MOOC Teaching, and TV in Local Loop Networks (RTTH)
  • 6.1.
  • 2.4.
  • Operational need for multicast in PMR networks
  • 6.2.
  • Triple play, the need for multicast TV and massive open online course (MOOC)
  • 6.3.
  • Quantitative elementary modeling of the fiber vs 4G local loop choice
  • 6.3.1.
  • Average distance center - household with fibering
  • 6.3.2.
  • Cost model for the fibering solution to the home (FTTH) vs 4G Radio (RTTH)
  • 6.4.
  • Using the multicast for MCPTT and federating MBFSN areas
  • 3GPP multicast architecture
  • 6.5.
  • Detailed call flow of an MBMS session
  • 6.5.1.
  • Overall call flow
  • 6.5.2.
  • M3/diameter messages MCE [ї́ѫ] MME: Role of the MCE
  • 6.5.3.
  • M2/diameter messages eNodeB H MCE
  • 6.5.4.
  • 2.4.1.
  • "Joining" (MBMS multicast activation by the user) GC1 UE [ї́ѫ] application server
  • 6.6.
  • Centralized or distributed multicast coordination entity (MCE)
  • 6.7.
  • MBMS delivery and eMBMS-capable device stack
  • 6.7.1.
  • Group communication delivery appeared in [6.7Rel 13]
  • 6.7.2.
  • Transparent delivery appeared in [6.7 Rel 14] and other modes
  • 6.8.
  • Introduction to eMBMS
  • Interoperability: Intergroup and interagency communication
  • 6.9.
  • Architecture with virtual machines --
  • 2.4.1.1.
  • Broadcast mode
  • 2.4.1.2.
  • 1.
  • Multicast mode
  • 2.4.2.
  • Attachment of a tactical network in an existing federation: GCS AS-centric architecture
  • 2.5.
  • MBMS extension of the radio coverage of the new joining tactical network
  • 2.5.1.
  • Crude basic federation (cross-copying) active service to another service area
  • 2.5.2.
  • Federated MCEs or central MCE?
  • 2.5.2.1.
  • Introduction
  • MBMS LTE channels
  • 2.5.2.2.
  • Meaning of "MBMS synchronization," role of the central or coordinated MCE
  • 2.5.2.3.
  • Behavior of an MBMS-enabled UE
  • 2.5.2.4.
  • Optimization of the MBMS channel allocation between federated groups
  • 2.5.2.5.
  • Meaning of MBMS synchronization, role of the MCE
  • 2.6.
  • 2.
  • Overview of a PMR or local loop network architecture: Inclusion of direct calls' support
  • 2.6.1.
  • PMR HLR-HSS capabilities and architecture
  • 2.6.2.
  • Proximity services (ProSe)
  • References
  • 3.
  • Geo-Localization of PMR Group Members and Monitoring of the Quality of Service with the ECID Method
  • 3.1.
  • Operational need for a geo-localization service in PMR networks
  • LTE PMR Networks: Service, Seamless Federation of Tactical Networks, Backup by the Public Operators' Coverage, and Direct Calls
  • 3.2.
  • Localization methods in tactical networks
  • 3.2.1.
  • Enabling the LPP protocol in the UEs
  • 3.2.2.
  • Using SUPL as main geo-localization protocol
  • 3.3.
  • ECID positioning method (LPP control plane) using a graphic interface
  • 3.4.
  • Cell database for the ECID method yielding the UE received signal level
  • 2.1.
  • 3.5.
  • Why not use GPS positioning method (LPP control plane)?
  • 3.6.
  • ECID method: Calculation of the physical measures from the measurements received from the UE
  • 3.6.1.
  • RSRP measurement [ї́ѫ] Dbm values for signal level at the UE
  • 3.6.2.
  • UE Rx-Tx [ї́ѫ] distance estimate between UE and eNodeB
  • 3.6.3.
  • Field results and coverage comparisons between various eNodeBs
  • PMR tactical network elements
  • 3.6.4.
  • Operational use and presentation of the ECID method results in PMR tactical networks
  • References
  • 4.
  • Choice of the SIM Card Type for PMR or M2M Networks and Automatic Profile Switching Possibilities
  • 4.1.
  • Classical UICC, eUICC M2M, or eUICC "consumer" SIM cards
  • 4.1.1.
  • Usage difference
  • 4.1.2.
  • 2.2.
  • Difference of logical structure between UICC and eUICC
  • 4.1.2.1.
  • eUICC
  • 4.1.2.2.
  • UICC
  • 4.1.2.3.
  • Recent file additions for all card types
  • 4.2.
  • Remote provisioning system for eUICC (M2M and consumer)
  • 4.2.1.
  • 7.3.
  • Reminder of the VoTT architecture for a pure VoIP MNO
  • 7.3.1.
  • Public identity for VoTT VoIP vs LTE
  • 7.3.2.
  • VoTT VoIP network architecture
  • 7.4.
  • IMS-based PMR network architecture for the services
  • 7.4.1.
  • Equivalence between 3G/2G notions, VoLTE/IMS, WiFi EAPsiim/VoTT, and SIP VoTT
  • 7.4.2.
  • Equivalence between 3G/4G notions and the equivalent in IMS (mobility management of Cx/diameter)
  • 7.4.3.
  • Incoming call (protocol Cx/diameter)
  • 7.4.4.
  • IMS subscriber's services' management (protocol Sh/diameter)
  • 7.5.
  • Call flow of the IMS services
  • 7.5.1.
  • IMS registration: Voice calls
  • References
  • 7.5.1.1.
  • Authentication of the subscriber, VoLTE and OTT VoIP compatible core IMS: MAR and MAA/Cx messages
  • 7.5.1.2.
  • Registration in the HSS to be able to receive calls and SMS
  • 7.5.1.3.
  • De-registration of a subscriber
  • 7.5.2.
  • Handling of incoming calls or SMS from the PSTSN or the SS7 network
  • 7.5.2.1.
  • Emergency call handling in IMS with calling party localization
  • 7.
  • 7.5.2.2.
  • SMS
  • 7.5.2.3.
  • Charging of the calls and SMS
  • 7.5.3.
  • Outgoing SMS or voice calls to the SS7 network or the PSTN --
  • Integration of IMS and VoLTE in the PMR Networks and the MNOs, Details on the PCC Processing, and Access Using a Non-trusted WLAN (WiFi with an ePDG)
  • 7.1.
  • WiFi and V6LTE4G access to a PMR central core network
  • 7.2.
  • Operational need for VoLTE in PMR networks
  • Anti-tromboning of the calls to mobiles 3G: The SORTA method [7.16] passive camel monitoring and MAP call transfer package
  • Join server (equivalent of an HLR for just the authentication function)
  • 9.4.1.6.
  • Application server
  • 9.4.1.7.
  • Packet transmission
  • 9.4.2.
  • Device classes
  • 9.4.3.
  • Device addressing, LoRa roaming, and LoRa hubs
  • 9.5.
  • 7.5.4.1.
  • LoRa virtual roaming hubs
  • 9.5.1.
  • Architecture principles
  • 9.5.2.
  • Setups between a LoRa hub operator and visited LoRa network partners
  • 9.5.3.
  • Detailed explanation of the LoRa hub operation
  • 9.5.3.1.
  • Commercial aims: No agreement between the visited and home LoRa networks, one-stop shopping with the LoRa hub operator
  • 9.5.3.2.
  • general tromboning for outgoing calls to 3G with conditional forwarding of unsuccessful calls
  • Explanation of the control plane call flow
  • 9.5.3.3.
  • User data call flow for a LoRa hub
  • 9.5.4.
  • Geo-localization in LoRa and applications: TDOA is the most appropriate method
  • References
  • 10.
  • Advanced Policy Control and Charging (PCC), Standard Provisioning Architecture for HLR-HSS and PCRF
  • 10.1.
  • Destination IP-dependent charging with an external DPI (deep packet inspection)
  • 7.5.4.2.
  • 10.1.1.
  • Architecture consequence to satisfy the rerouting requirement
  • 10.1.2.
  • Rating plan-dependent charging
  • 10.1.3.
  • Data charging diagram
  • 10.1.4.
  • Slow-down policing with an external DPI
  • 10.1.4.1.
  • Gx-based slow-down policing implementation in the DPI
  • Anti-tromboning #1, 3GPP MAP method, not applicable in practice
  • 10.1.4.2.
  • Rx-Based slow-down policing implementation in the DPI
  • 10.1.5.
  • Traces for the charging by an external DPI
  • 10.1.5.1.
  • Data provided by the GGSN-PGW which may be used for charging
  • 10.1.5.2.
  • RADIUS interface between GGSN-PGW and PCEF-DPI (which is the radius server)
  • 10.1.5.3.
  • Content of the RADIUS accounting-request (start) received by the PCEF-DPI
  • 7.5.4.3.
  • 10.1.5.4.
  • Content of the RADIUS accounting-request (stop) receive by the PCEF-DPI
  • 10.2.
  • Standard 3GPP user data provisioning: LDAP and SOAP
  • 10.2.1.
  • 3GPP user data repository architecture
  • References
  • 11.
  • Appendix: Detailed Traces for the Different Chapters
  • 11.1.
  • Anti-tromboning # 2, pure ISUP handling by the GMSC-IMS: Simple but not quite general
  • Triggering the IP connection of the SIM IP to the OTA-IP server
  • 11.1.1.
  • OTA-IP configuration of the SIM for TCP (HTTPs) for UDP (BIP/CAT-TP)
  • 11.1.2.
  • Triggering the OTA-IP connection from the "applet for OTA pull" or with an SMS-MT
  • 11.1.3.
  • Details of the SMS-MT to network initiate a forced BIP/CAT-TP (IP UDP connection to the OTA server while the SIM configuration is IP TCP (HTTPs)
  • 11.1.3.1.
  • Coding of the SMS-MT payload (ETSI TS 223 to open the BIP and CAT-TP channels
  • 11.1.3.2.
  • 7.5.4.4.
  • SMS-MT parameters details (TS 23.040)
  • 11.1.3.3.
  • Opening of the IP channel by the SIM card
  • 11.1.3.4.
  • Confirmation of the reception of triggering SMS-MT by the SIM and of the establishment of the IP UDP channel to the OTA IP server
  • 11.1.3.5.
  • OTA-IP sequence of commands (read IMSI)
  • 11.1.3.6.
  • SMS-MO received by the OTA server with the PoR
  • 11.1.3.7.
  • Anti-tromboning # 3, the SORTA method [7.16]: CAMEL and use of MAP Resume Call Handling By A Camel Handling SCP: Rigorous
  • Completion and closing of the OTA-IP session
  • 11.2.
  • SMS-MT with diameter SMSC [ї́ѫ] UE
  • 11.2.1.
  • SMS-MO with diameter UE [ї́ѫ] SMSC
  • 11.3.
  • Multicast: Traces M2AP, M3AP, Sgmb, and GTP V2
  • 11.3.1.
  • M2 SETUP request eNodeB [ї́ѫ] MCE
  • 11.3.2.
  • 7.5.4.5.
  • M3 SETUP request MCE [ї́ѫ] MME
  • 11.3.3.
  • M3 SETUP response MME [ї́ѫ] MCE
  • 11.3.4.
  • M2 SETUP response MCE [ї́ѫ] NodeB
  • 11.3.5.
  • Sgmb RAR BM-SC [ї́ѫ] MBMS GW
  • 11.3.6.
  • GTPV2 MBMS session start request MBMS GW [ї́ѫ] MME
  • 11.3.7.
  • Contents note continued:
  • Trace details CAMEL and MAP of the SORTA anti-tromboning
  • SGmb RAA MBMS GW [ї́ѫ] BM-SC
  • 11.3.8.
  • M3 MBMS session start request MME [ї́ѫ] MCE
  • 11.3.9.
  • M3 MBMS session start response MCE [ї́ѫ] MME
  • 11.3.10.
  • GTPV2 MBMS session start response MME H MBMS GW
  • 11.4.
  • Traces IoT
  • 11.4.1.
  • 7.6.
  • Subscriber information request (SIR) and answer (SIA) MTC-IWF [ї́ѫ] HSS S6m/diameter
  • 11.4.2.
  • Devices trigger request (DTR) and answer (DTA) MTC-IWF [ї́ѫ] SMSC T4/diameter
  • 11.4.3.
  • Transfer forward request (TFR) and answer (TFA) SMSC [ї́ѫ] MME Sgd/diameter (SMS-MT)
  • 11.4.3.1.
  • Uplink NAS transport request MME [ї́ѫ] UE and downlink NAS transport UE [ї́ѫ] MME
  • 11.4.4.
  • Delivery report request (DRR) and answer (DRA) SMSC [ї́ѫ] MTC-IWF T4/diameter
  • 11.5.
  • What brings VoLTE, interest of IMS for the combined mobile-fixed service
  • Traces of a recursive DNS request
  • 12.
  • Conclusion: Full LTE for Security Forces, When?
  • References
  • 7.7.
  • Roaming VoLTE with local break out
  • 7.8.
  • Traces of user data (subscriber profile) in a server assignment answer (SAA/Cx)
  • 7.9.
  • IMS files and certificates in the SIM card
  • 7.9.1.
  • 7.5.3.1.
  • IMS files in an ISIM card
  • 7.9.2.
  • SIM files with the root certificate
  • 7.10.
  • QoS parameter mapping GTPv2 [ї́ѳ] Gx [ї́ѳ] Rx [ї́ѳ] application function
  • 7.10.1.
  • Dedicated bearer creation, traces Rx and Gx
  • 7.10.2.
  • PCRF processing: Correspondences between the GTPv2 parameters and the AVPs Gx et Rx
  • 7.11.
  • SMS
  • Access through a non-trusted WLAN (WiFi) to the PMR core networking
  • 7.11.1.
  • Operational interest
  • 7.11.2.
  • Call flow to establish the IPsec tunnel and localize a WiFi UE in the HLR-HSS
  • References
  • 8.
  • Lawful Interception 3GPP Architecture and PMR Network Case
  • 8.1.
  • Legal interception applied to PMR networks: Use for monitoring and security
  • 7.5.3.2.
  • 8.2.
  • LI standard 3GPP architecture
  • 8.2.1.
  • Proprietary interfaces of the network equipment and standardization
  • 8.2.2.
  • LI management notification operation (HI 1 interface)
  • 8.2.3.
  • HI2: Handover interface port 2 (ASN1 coding)
  • 8.2.4.
  • HI3: Handover interface port 3
  • Charging
  • 8.3.
  • Services concerned by the interception need
  • 8.4.
  • Practical use of the content interception HI3 or X3
  • 8.4.1.
  • Use of metadata
  • 8.4.2.
  • Non-judiciary interception methods of security agencies
  • References
  • 9.
  • 7.5.3.3.
  • Diameter-Based M2M (LTE-M and NB-IoT) 3GPP Services and LoRa
  • 9.1.
  • Operational need for M2M in PMR networks
  • 9.2.
  • 3GPP NB-IOT type of services between the AS IoT server and the M2M devices: Direct, indirect, and hybrid model implementations
  • 9.3.
  • Necessary additional diameter protocols in an "IoT ready" EPC for the "indirect model"
  • 9.3.1.
  • T4 interface from the application IoT to the MTC-IWF and then to the SMSC
  • 9.3.2.
  • 3G Voice calls to a subscriber in a mobile network: Non-IMS case
  • S6m and S6t interfaces with the HLR-HSS TS 29.336
  • 9.3.3.
  • T6a and T6b interfaces between MME or SGSN and MTC-IWF TS 29.128
  • 9.3.4.
  • Tsp interface between the SCS and the MTC-IWF (TS 29.368)
  • 9.3.5.
  • Implementation strategy, what is the simplest and most general implementation for IoT
  • 9.4.
  • LoRa
  • 9.4.1.
  • 7.5.4.
  • LoRaWAN architecture
  • 9.4.1.1.
  • End-device (equivalent of combined UE +SIM card)
  • 9.4.1.2.
  • Radio gateway (equivalent of an RNC 3G)
  • 9.4.1.3.
  • Network server (equivalent of SGSN 3G (no GGSN equivalent used))
  • 9.4.1.4.
  • Central DNS of the LoRa alliance
  • 9.4.1.5.
Control code
MSTDDA5528846
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource ( 356 p..):
Form of item
online
Isbn
9788793609785
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote

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