Coverart for item
The Resource Repertoires and choices in african languages, Friederike Lüpke & Anne Storch

Repertoires and choices in african languages, Friederike Lüpke & Anne Storch

Label
Repertoires and choices in african languages
Title
Repertoires and choices in african languages
Statement of responsibility
Friederike Lüpke & Anne Storch
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Africa is one of the hotspots of linguistic diversity, and most African languages are spoken by multilingual communities. The persistence of multilingualism and the linguistic creativity are striking, especially against the backdrop of ""language death"" and expanding monolingualism elsewhere in the world. This volume deals with multilingualism as a cultural technique, register variation and the multiplicity of language ideologies, and the dynamics of linguistic change in Africa's minority languages. It argues that that in terms of multilingualism and language survival, Africa can serve as a p
Member of
Cataloging source
CN3GA
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Lüpke, Friederike
Dewey number
496
Index
no index present
LC call number
P115.5.A35
LC item number
L87 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Storch, Anne
Series statement
Language Contact and Bilingualism LCB
Series volume
v. 5
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Multilingualism
  • Linguistic change
  • Languages in contact
  • Language and culture
  • Africa
  • Language and languages
  • FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDY
  • Language and culture
  • Language and languages
  • Language and languages
  • Languages in contact
  • Linguistic change
  • Multilingualism
  • Africa
Label
Repertoires and choices in african languages, Friederike Lüpke & Anne Storch
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; List of Tables, Maps and Figures; List of figures with cited and archived web pages; Copyrights for reproduced photographs; List of Languages; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 What this book is about; 2 Structure of the book; 1 Multilingualism on the ground; 1.1 Societal multilingualism in Senegal; 1.2 Individual repertoires: six case studies; 1.2.1 Localist identities for moving targets; 1.2.2 Purposeful alienation: the ethnolinguistic chameleon; 1.2.3 The rhetorical return to lost roots; 1.2.4 A return to what roots?; 1.2.5 I am what I speak?; 1.2.6 Well, I'm not what I speak
  • 1.3 Societal practices nurturing multilingualism1.3.1 Exogynous marriage patterns and movement of daughters; 1.3.2 Language acquisition in peer groups and age classes; 1.3.3 Fostering; 1.3.4 Professional, ritual and crisis mobility and migration; 1.3.5 Joking relationships; 1.4 Written languages and the interaction of written and spoken repertoires; 1.4.1 The ecology of writing in Senegal; 1.4.2 The making of guilty illiterates; 1.4.3 African writing: what scope, which languages and scripts?; 1.4.3.1 Grapho- and eurocentric ideologies and "restricted literacies."
  • 1.4.3.2 Some literacies are more visible than others1.4.3.3 Ajami literacies; 1.4.3.4 The Ge'ez script; 1.4.3.5 The Bamun syllabary; 1.4.3.6 N'ko; 1.4.3.7 The Tifinagh script; 1.4.3.8 The Vai syllabary; 1.5 For an integrated view of spoken and written multilingual and multiscriptal practices; 2 Doing things with words; 2.1 Some symbolic dimensions of language; 2.2 A complete language; 2.3 Speech registers; 2.3.1 Play languages; 2.3.2 Youth languages; 2.3.3 Respect languages and other examples of paralexification; 2.3.4 Special purpose languages; 2.3.5 Avoidance languages
  • 2.3.6 Ritual languages2.3.7 Spirit languages; 2.4 What we can learn from users of speech registers; 3 Language and ideology; 3.1 Language and power; 3.1.1 Missionary activities and literacy development efforts; 3.1.2 Power relationships; 3.1.3 Conflicting language ideologies; 3.2 Reducing diversity and creating standards; 3.3 Constructing linguistic deficits and reacting to language obsolescence; 3.3.1 Lack of words, abundance of sounds; 3.3.2 The visible and the invisible; 3.4 Remaining who we are: local theories and concepts of translation; 3.4.1 Socio-historical background
  • 3.4.2 Foreign text in women's tales3.4.3 Translating silence; 3.5 Ways of making history; 3.5.1 Eastern origins; 3.5.2 Hone interpretations of Kisra traditions; 3.5.3 Spirits of the past; 3.5.4 Where people think (and don't think) they come from; 3.6 Ideologies, semiotics and multilingualism; 4 Language and knowledge; 4.1 Creation of knowledge; 4.1.1 The invention of tradition; 4.1.2 The view from within; 4.1.3 Essentialization vs. inclusion; 4.2 Invention of evolution: colonial encounters; 4.2.1 Why collect, count and classify African languages?
Control code
852835683
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781614511946
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)852835683
Label
Repertoires and choices in african languages, Friederike Lüpke & Anne Storch
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; List of Tables, Maps and Figures; List of figures with cited and archived web pages; Copyrights for reproduced photographs; List of Languages; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 What this book is about; 2 Structure of the book; 1 Multilingualism on the ground; 1.1 Societal multilingualism in Senegal; 1.2 Individual repertoires: six case studies; 1.2.1 Localist identities for moving targets; 1.2.2 Purposeful alienation: the ethnolinguistic chameleon; 1.2.3 The rhetorical return to lost roots; 1.2.4 A return to what roots?; 1.2.5 I am what I speak?; 1.2.6 Well, I'm not what I speak
  • 1.3 Societal practices nurturing multilingualism1.3.1 Exogynous marriage patterns and movement of daughters; 1.3.2 Language acquisition in peer groups and age classes; 1.3.3 Fostering; 1.3.4 Professional, ritual and crisis mobility and migration; 1.3.5 Joking relationships; 1.4 Written languages and the interaction of written and spoken repertoires; 1.4.1 The ecology of writing in Senegal; 1.4.2 The making of guilty illiterates; 1.4.3 African writing: what scope, which languages and scripts?; 1.4.3.1 Grapho- and eurocentric ideologies and "restricted literacies."
  • 1.4.3.2 Some literacies are more visible than others1.4.3.3 Ajami literacies; 1.4.3.4 The Ge'ez script; 1.4.3.5 The Bamun syllabary; 1.4.3.6 N'ko; 1.4.3.7 The Tifinagh script; 1.4.3.8 The Vai syllabary; 1.5 For an integrated view of spoken and written multilingual and multiscriptal practices; 2 Doing things with words; 2.1 Some symbolic dimensions of language; 2.2 A complete language; 2.3 Speech registers; 2.3.1 Play languages; 2.3.2 Youth languages; 2.3.3 Respect languages and other examples of paralexification; 2.3.4 Special purpose languages; 2.3.5 Avoidance languages
  • 2.3.6 Ritual languages2.3.7 Spirit languages; 2.4 What we can learn from users of speech registers; 3 Language and ideology; 3.1 Language and power; 3.1.1 Missionary activities and literacy development efforts; 3.1.2 Power relationships; 3.1.3 Conflicting language ideologies; 3.2 Reducing diversity and creating standards; 3.3 Constructing linguistic deficits and reacting to language obsolescence; 3.3.1 Lack of words, abundance of sounds; 3.3.2 The visible and the invisible; 3.4 Remaining who we are: local theories and concepts of translation; 3.4.1 Socio-historical background
  • 3.4.2 Foreign text in women's tales3.4.3 Translating silence; 3.5 Ways of making history; 3.5.1 Eastern origins; 3.5.2 Hone interpretations of Kisra traditions; 3.5.3 Spirits of the past; 3.5.4 Where people think (and don't think) they come from; 3.6 Ideologies, semiotics and multilingualism; 4 Language and knowledge; 4.1 Creation of knowledge; 4.1.1 The invention of tradition; 4.1.2 The view from within; 4.1.3 Essentialization vs. inclusion; 4.2 Invention of evolution: colonial encounters; 4.2.1 Why collect, count and classify African languages?
Control code
852835683
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781614511946
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)852835683

Library Locations

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      37.955220 -91.772210
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