Coverart for item
The Resource Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks

Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks

Label
Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks
Title
Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Sha, Kewei
Dewey number
005.8
Index
no index present
LC call number
TK5105.59
LC item number
.S442 2017
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Striegel, Aaron
  • Song, Min
Series statement
River Publishers Series in Communications
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Computer networks
  • Computer networks
Label
Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover -- Half Title Page -- RIVER PUBLISHERS SERIES IN INNOVATION AND CHANGE IN EDUCATION -- CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE -- Title Page -- Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- List of Contributors -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- List of Algorithms -- List of Abbreviations -- PART I -- Privacy -- Chapter 1 -- Distributed Beamforming Relay Selection to Increase Base Station Anonymity in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks -- Abstract -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Anonymity Definition, Metrics, and Contemporary Measures -- 1.2.1 Anonymity Definition and Assessment -- 1.2.2 Antitraffic Analysis Measures -- 1.3 System Assumptions and Attack Model -- 1.3.1 Network Model -- 1.3.2 Adversary Model -- 1.3.3 Evidence Theory and Belief Metric -- 1.4 Distributed Beamforming to Increase the BS Anonymity -- 1.4.1 Overview of the DiBAN Protocol -- 1.4.2 DiBAN Illustrative Example -- 1.4.3 DiBAN Energy Analysis -- 1.5 Distributed Beamforming Relay Selection Approach -- 1.6 Validation Experiments -- 1.6.1 Simulation Environment -- 1.6.2 Simulation Results -- 1.7 Conclusions and FutureWork -- Appendix I: Numerical Evidence Theory Belief Calculation Example -- References -- Chapter 2 -- A Privacy-Preserving and Efficient Information Sharing Scheme for VANET Secure Communication -- Abstract -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Related Works -- 2.3 System Model and Preliminaries -- 2.3.1 Network Model -- 2.3.2 Attack Model -- 2.3.3 Security Requirements -- 2.4 The Proposed PETS Scheme -- 2.4.1 Scheme Overview -- 2.4.2 System Initiation -- 2.4.3 Vehicle-RSU Key Agreement -- 2.4.4 Traffic Information Collection and Aggregation -- 2.4.5 Traffic Jam Message Propagation -- 2.5 Security Analysis -- 2.6 Performance Evaluation -- 2.6.1 Traffic Information Sending/Collection Overhead
  • 2.6.2 Traffic Information Propagation/Verification Overhead -- 2.6.3 Scheme Simulation -- 2.7 Conclusion -- References -- PART II -- Vulnerabilities, Detection and Monitoring -- Chapter 3 -- DIAMoND: Distributed Intrusion/Anomaly Monitoring for Nonparametric Detection -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Literature Review -- 3.3 System Design -- 3.3.1 Architecture Overview -- 3.3.2 Detection Unit -- 3.3.3 Coordination Unit -- 3.3.4 Communication Protocol -- 3.3.5 Neighborhood Strategies -- 3.3.6 Rogue Nodes -- 3.4 Evaluation Setup -- 3.4.1 Software Implementation -- 3.4.2 Physical Topologies -- 3.4.3 Legitimate and Malicious Traffic -- 3.5 Emulation Results -- 3.5.1 Detection Accuracy -- 3.5.2 Impact of Physical Topologies -- 3.5.3 Influence of Neighborhood Strategies -- 3.5.4 Minimal and Marginal Deployment Gain -- 3.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 4 -- Detection of Service Level Agreement (SLA) Violations in Memory Management in Virtual Machines -- Abstract -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Related Work -- 4.2.1 Information Leakage among Virtual Machines -- 4.2.2 Service Level Agreement Enforcement -- 4.3 The Proposed Approaches -- 4.3.1 Memory Overcommitment in Virtualization Environments -- 4.3.2 Memory Deduplication in VM Hypervisors -- 4.3.3 System Assumptions -- 4.3.4 Basic Ideas of the Proposed Approaches -- 4.3.5 Details of Implementation -- 4.3.5.1 Choice of memory pages -- 4.3.5.2 Measurement of access time -- 4.3.5.3 Verification of memory access order -- 4.3.6 Detection Procedures of the SLA Violations -- 4.4 Experimental Results -- 4.4.1 Experimental Environment Setup -- 4.4.2 Experiments and Results -- 4.4.3 Impacts on System Performance -- 4.5 Discussion -- 4.5.1 Reducing False Alarms -- 4.5.2 Impacts of Extra Memory Demand -- 4.5.3 Building A Unified Detection Algorithm -- 4.6 Conclusion -- References
  • Chapter 5 -- Analysis of Mobile Threats and Security Vulnerabilities for Mobile Platforms and Devices -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Analysis of Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.1 Dominating Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.1.1 iPhone Operating System (iOS) -- 5.2.1.2 Android operating system (Android) -- 5.2.1.3 BlackBerry operating system -- 5.2.2 Security Models for Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.2.1 iOS security model -- 5.2.2.2 Android security model -- 5.2.2.3 BlackBerry security model -- 5.2.3 Existing Security Vulnerabilities in Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.3.1 Potential vulnerabilities -- 5.2.3.2 Mobile device malware -- 5.3 Threat Model for Mobile Platforms -- 5.3.1 Goals and Motives for an Attacker -- 5.3.1.1 Cybercriminals: outsourcing sensitive data -- 5.3.1.2 Cybercriminals: cyber heist -- 5.3.1.3 Cybercriminals: corporate espionage and sabotage -- 5.3.2 Attack Vectors or Modern Exploitation Techniquesfor Mobile Devices -- 5.3.2.1 Susceptibility on the mobile through hardware -- 5.3.2.2 Attacking through theWeb -- 5.3.2.3 Mobile intrusion and deception through social engineering -- 5.3.2.4 Attacking through the mobile network -- 5.3.2.5 Cyber Arson through common mobile applications -- 5.3.2.6 Attacking via Bluetooth connection -- 5.3.3 Types of Malwares in Mobile Devices -- 5.3.3.1 Trojan-related malware -- 5.3.3.2 Worms targeting mobile devices -- 5.3.3.3 Viruses on the mobile -- 5.3.3.4 Ransomware: a mobile kidnapping -- 5.3.3.5 Mobile botnets -- 5.4 Defense Mechanisms for Securing Mobile Platforms -- 5.4.1 Keychain Authentication and Encryption -- 5.4.2 Binary Protection and Hardening -- 5.4.3 Third-Party OS Products -- 5.4.4 Obfuscators and Optimizers -- 5.4.5 Compiler and Linker Defense Mechanisms -- 5.4.6 Certificate-based Mobile Authentication -- 5.4.7 Token-based Mobile Authentication -- 5.4.8 Summary -- 5.5 Related Work
  • 5.6 Threats Analysis and Future Trends -- 5.7 Conclusion -- References -- PART III -- Cryptographic Algorithms -- Chapter 6 -- Quasigroup-Based Encryption for Low-Powered Devices -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Background-Low Energy Cryptosystems -- 6.3 Overview of Quasigroup Encryption -- 6.4 The Preliminary Block Cipher Design -- 6.5 Overview of Software Implementation -- 6.6 Overview of Three FPGA Implementations -- 6.6.1 The Quasigroup Implementation -- 6.6.2 Comparison Design-Parallel AES -- 6.6.3 Hybrid Front-End/AES Design -- 6.7 Experimental Results -- 6.8 Toward a Single-Chip Implementation -- 6.9 Algorithm Results for B = 2 to 8 -- 6.10 Generating Quasigroups Fast -- 6.11 Our Quasigroup Block Cipher Algorithm -- 6.12 Cryptanalysis and Improvements in the Block Cipher -- 6.13 Overview of a General Linear Cryptanalytical Attack -- 6.14 The LAT Design -- 6.15 Pilingup Attempts for N = 16, 32, and 64 -- 6.16 Analysis of the Attack on the Quasigroup -- 6.17 The Issue of a Total Linear Bias of 1/2 -- 6.18 Attack Complexity -- 6.19 Possible Changes that Could Be Made in the Design of This Attack Model -- 6.20 Which Quasigroup Order Is Best? -- 6.21 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 7 -- Measuring Interpretation and Evaluationof Client-side Encryption Tools in Cloud Computing -- Abstract -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) -- 7.3 Deployment Model of Cloud Service Provider -- 7.4 Methodology -- 7.5 Deriving the Attributes of Existing Tools -- 7.5.1 AxCrypt -- 7.5.2 nCrypted Cloud -- 7.5.3 SafeBox -- 7.5.4 SpiderOak -- 7.5.5 Viivo -- 7.6 Comparison of the Studied Tools -- 7.7 Characteristics of the Studied Tools -- 7.8 Security of Encryption and Key Generation Mechanisms of the Studied Tools -- 7.9 Performance Measurement and Analysis -- 7.9.1 System Setup -- 7.9.1.1 Application tools -- 7.9.1.2 Cloud service provider
  • 7.9.1.3 Testing environment -- 7.9.2 Analysis -- 7.10 Results and Discussion -- 7.11 Conclusion and Future Work -- References -- Chapter 8 -- Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers: Constructions, Analysis, and Implementations -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Preliminaries -- 8.2.1 Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test -- 8.2.2 KSA Distinguisher -- 8.2.3 PKS Distinguisher -- 8.3 Systematic Construction of KS Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers -- 8.3.1 Construction Strategies of KSA and PKS -- 8.3.2 Nine Variants of KS Test-based Distinguishers -- 8.4 An Experiment Analysis of All Twelve KS Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers -- 8.5 Implementation Methods of MPC-KSA [13] -- 8.5.1 Analysis of the Naive Method -- 8.5.2 Optimized Method I -- 8.5.3 Optimized Method II -- 8.6 Implementation Results -- 8.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 9 -- Multi-antenna Transmission Technique with Constellation Shaping for Secrecy at Physical Layer -- Abstract -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Transmitter Structure -- 9.3 Transmitter Configuration Possibilities and Security -- 9.4 Receivers and the Impact of Information Directivity -- 9.4.1 Simulation Results -- 9.4.2 Transmitter Configuration Effects in MI and Secrecy -- 9.5 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- PART VI -- Reliable System Design -- Chapter 10 -Active Sub-Areas-Based Multi-Copy Routing in VDTNs -- Abstract -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 RelatedWork -- 10.3 Identification of Each Vehicle's Active Sub-areas -- 10.4 Trace Measurement -- 10.4.1 Vehicle Mobility Pattern -- 10.4.2 Relationship between Contact and Location -- 10.5 Active Area-based Routing Method -- 10.5.1 Traffic-Considered Shortest Path Spreading -- 10.5.1.1 Road traffic measurement -- 10.5.1.2 Building traffic-considered shortest path tree -- 10.5.2 Contact-based Scanning in Each Active Sub-area
Control code
967538455
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (446 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9788793379909
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)967538455
Label
Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover -- Half Title Page -- RIVER PUBLISHERS SERIES IN INNOVATION AND CHANGE IN EDUCATION -- CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE -- Title Page -- Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- List of Contributors -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- List of Algorithms -- List of Abbreviations -- PART I -- Privacy -- Chapter 1 -- Distributed Beamforming Relay Selection to Increase Base Station Anonymity in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks -- Abstract -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Anonymity Definition, Metrics, and Contemporary Measures -- 1.2.1 Anonymity Definition and Assessment -- 1.2.2 Antitraffic Analysis Measures -- 1.3 System Assumptions and Attack Model -- 1.3.1 Network Model -- 1.3.2 Adversary Model -- 1.3.3 Evidence Theory and Belief Metric -- 1.4 Distributed Beamforming to Increase the BS Anonymity -- 1.4.1 Overview of the DiBAN Protocol -- 1.4.2 DiBAN Illustrative Example -- 1.4.3 DiBAN Energy Analysis -- 1.5 Distributed Beamforming Relay Selection Approach -- 1.6 Validation Experiments -- 1.6.1 Simulation Environment -- 1.6.2 Simulation Results -- 1.7 Conclusions and FutureWork -- Appendix I: Numerical Evidence Theory Belief Calculation Example -- References -- Chapter 2 -- A Privacy-Preserving and Efficient Information Sharing Scheme for VANET Secure Communication -- Abstract -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Related Works -- 2.3 System Model and Preliminaries -- 2.3.1 Network Model -- 2.3.2 Attack Model -- 2.3.3 Security Requirements -- 2.4 The Proposed PETS Scheme -- 2.4.1 Scheme Overview -- 2.4.2 System Initiation -- 2.4.3 Vehicle-RSU Key Agreement -- 2.4.4 Traffic Information Collection and Aggregation -- 2.4.5 Traffic Jam Message Propagation -- 2.5 Security Analysis -- 2.6 Performance Evaluation -- 2.6.1 Traffic Information Sending/Collection Overhead
  • 2.6.2 Traffic Information Propagation/Verification Overhead -- 2.6.3 Scheme Simulation -- 2.7 Conclusion -- References -- PART II -- Vulnerabilities, Detection and Monitoring -- Chapter 3 -- DIAMoND: Distributed Intrusion/Anomaly Monitoring for Nonparametric Detection -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Literature Review -- 3.3 System Design -- 3.3.1 Architecture Overview -- 3.3.2 Detection Unit -- 3.3.3 Coordination Unit -- 3.3.4 Communication Protocol -- 3.3.5 Neighborhood Strategies -- 3.3.6 Rogue Nodes -- 3.4 Evaluation Setup -- 3.4.1 Software Implementation -- 3.4.2 Physical Topologies -- 3.4.3 Legitimate and Malicious Traffic -- 3.5 Emulation Results -- 3.5.1 Detection Accuracy -- 3.5.2 Impact of Physical Topologies -- 3.5.3 Influence of Neighborhood Strategies -- 3.5.4 Minimal and Marginal Deployment Gain -- 3.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 4 -- Detection of Service Level Agreement (SLA) Violations in Memory Management in Virtual Machines -- Abstract -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Related Work -- 4.2.1 Information Leakage among Virtual Machines -- 4.2.2 Service Level Agreement Enforcement -- 4.3 The Proposed Approaches -- 4.3.1 Memory Overcommitment in Virtualization Environments -- 4.3.2 Memory Deduplication in VM Hypervisors -- 4.3.3 System Assumptions -- 4.3.4 Basic Ideas of the Proposed Approaches -- 4.3.5 Details of Implementation -- 4.3.5.1 Choice of memory pages -- 4.3.5.2 Measurement of access time -- 4.3.5.3 Verification of memory access order -- 4.3.6 Detection Procedures of the SLA Violations -- 4.4 Experimental Results -- 4.4.1 Experimental Environment Setup -- 4.4.2 Experiments and Results -- 4.4.3 Impacts on System Performance -- 4.5 Discussion -- 4.5.1 Reducing False Alarms -- 4.5.2 Impacts of Extra Memory Demand -- 4.5.3 Building A Unified Detection Algorithm -- 4.6 Conclusion -- References
  • Chapter 5 -- Analysis of Mobile Threats and Security Vulnerabilities for Mobile Platforms and Devices -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Analysis of Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.1 Dominating Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.1.1 iPhone Operating System (iOS) -- 5.2.1.2 Android operating system (Android) -- 5.2.1.3 BlackBerry operating system -- 5.2.2 Security Models for Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.2.1 iOS security model -- 5.2.2.2 Android security model -- 5.2.2.3 BlackBerry security model -- 5.2.3 Existing Security Vulnerabilities in Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.3.1 Potential vulnerabilities -- 5.2.3.2 Mobile device malware -- 5.3 Threat Model for Mobile Platforms -- 5.3.1 Goals and Motives for an Attacker -- 5.3.1.1 Cybercriminals: outsourcing sensitive data -- 5.3.1.2 Cybercriminals: cyber heist -- 5.3.1.3 Cybercriminals: corporate espionage and sabotage -- 5.3.2 Attack Vectors or Modern Exploitation Techniquesfor Mobile Devices -- 5.3.2.1 Susceptibility on the mobile through hardware -- 5.3.2.2 Attacking through theWeb -- 5.3.2.3 Mobile intrusion and deception through social engineering -- 5.3.2.4 Attacking through the mobile network -- 5.3.2.5 Cyber Arson through common mobile applications -- 5.3.2.6 Attacking via Bluetooth connection -- 5.3.3 Types of Malwares in Mobile Devices -- 5.3.3.1 Trojan-related malware -- 5.3.3.2 Worms targeting mobile devices -- 5.3.3.3 Viruses on the mobile -- 5.3.3.4 Ransomware: a mobile kidnapping -- 5.3.3.5 Mobile botnets -- 5.4 Defense Mechanisms for Securing Mobile Platforms -- 5.4.1 Keychain Authentication and Encryption -- 5.4.2 Binary Protection and Hardening -- 5.4.3 Third-Party OS Products -- 5.4.4 Obfuscators and Optimizers -- 5.4.5 Compiler and Linker Defense Mechanisms -- 5.4.6 Certificate-based Mobile Authentication -- 5.4.7 Token-based Mobile Authentication -- 5.4.8 Summary -- 5.5 Related Work
  • 5.6 Threats Analysis and Future Trends -- 5.7 Conclusion -- References -- PART III -- Cryptographic Algorithms -- Chapter 6 -- Quasigroup-Based Encryption for Low-Powered Devices -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Background-Low Energy Cryptosystems -- 6.3 Overview of Quasigroup Encryption -- 6.4 The Preliminary Block Cipher Design -- 6.5 Overview of Software Implementation -- 6.6 Overview of Three FPGA Implementations -- 6.6.1 The Quasigroup Implementation -- 6.6.2 Comparison Design-Parallel AES -- 6.6.3 Hybrid Front-End/AES Design -- 6.7 Experimental Results -- 6.8 Toward a Single-Chip Implementation -- 6.9 Algorithm Results for B = 2 to 8 -- 6.10 Generating Quasigroups Fast -- 6.11 Our Quasigroup Block Cipher Algorithm -- 6.12 Cryptanalysis and Improvements in the Block Cipher -- 6.13 Overview of a General Linear Cryptanalytical Attack -- 6.14 The LAT Design -- 6.15 Pilingup Attempts for N = 16, 32, and 64 -- 6.16 Analysis of the Attack on the Quasigroup -- 6.17 The Issue of a Total Linear Bias of 1/2 -- 6.18 Attack Complexity -- 6.19 Possible Changes that Could Be Made in the Design of This Attack Model -- 6.20 Which Quasigroup Order Is Best? -- 6.21 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 7 -- Measuring Interpretation and Evaluationof Client-side Encryption Tools in Cloud Computing -- Abstract -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) -- 7.3 Deployment Model of Cloud Service Provider -- 7.4 Methodology -- 7.5 Deriving the Attributes of Existing Tools -- 7.5.1 AxCrypt -- 7.5.2 nCrypted Cloud -- 7.5.3 SafeBox -- 7.5.4 SpiderOak -- 7.5.5 Viivo -- 7.6 Comparison of the Studied Tools -- 7.7 Characteristics of the Studied Tools -- 7.8 Security of Encryption and Key Generation Mechanisms of the Studied Tools -- 7.9 Performance Measurement and Analysis -- 7.9.1 System Setup -- 7.9.1.1 Application tools -- 7.9.1.2 Cloud service provider
  • 7.9.1.3 Testing environment -- 7.9.2 Analysis -- 7.10 Results and Discussion -- 7.11 Conclusion and Future Work -- References -- Chapter 8 -- Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers: Constructions, Analysis, and Implementations -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Preliminaries -- 8.2.1 Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test -- 8.2.2 KSA Distinguisher -- 8.2.3 PKS Distinguisher -- 8.3 Systematic Construction of KS Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers -- 8.3.1 Construction Strategies of KSA and PKS -- 8.3.2 Nine Variants of KS Test-based Distinguishers -- 8.4 An Experiment Analysis of All Twelve KS Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers -- 8.5 Implementation Methods of MPC-KSA [13] -- 8.5.1 Analysis of the Naive Method -- 8.5.2 Optimized Method I -- 8.5.3 Optimized Method II -- 8.6 Implementation Results -- 8.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 9 -- Multi-antenna Transmission Technique with Constellation Shaping for Secrecy at Physical Layer -- Abstract -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Transmitter Structure -- 9.3 Transmitter Configuration Possibilities and Security -- 9.4 Receivers and the Impact of Information Directivity -- 9.4.1 Simulation Results -- 9.4.2 Transmitter Configuration Effects in MI and Secrecy -- 9.5 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- PART VI -- Reliable System Design -- Chapter 10 -Active Sub-Areas-Based Multi-Copy Routing in VDTNs -- Abstract -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 RelatedWork -- 10.3 Identification of Each Vehicle's Active Sub-areas -- 10.4 Trace Measurement -- 10.4.1 Vehicle Mobility Pattern -- 10.4.2 Relationship between Contact and Location -- 10.5 Active Area-based Routing Method -- 10.5.1 Traffic-Considered Shortest Path Spreading -- 10.5.1.1 Road traffic measurement -- 10.5.1.2 Building traffic-considered shortest path tree -- 10.5.2 Contact-based Scanning in Each Active Sub-area
Control code
967538455
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (446 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9788793379909
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)967538455

Library Locations

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      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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