Coverart for item
The Resource Studies in Ancient Persian History (RLE Iran A)

Studies in Ancient Persian History (RLE Iran A)

Label
Studies in Ancient Persian History (RLE Iran A)
Title
Studies in Ancient Persian History (RLE Iran A)
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This volume lays the foundation of a "correct" view of ancient Persian history, which, in the author's opinion, had hitherto been approached from a "biased standpoint." It presents a survey of ancient and modern historians such as Gibbon, Malcolm and Rawlinson and critiques their work - either for having too much partiality for Greek and Latin writers, not being conversant with the literature of the East or not doing justice to the ancient Persians. Arab and Persian historians are also discussed and social, literary, legal, religious, economic and political questions examined
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kershasp, P
Dewey number
935.05
Index
no index present
LC call number
DS272 .K4
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Routledge Library Editions: Iran
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Iran
  • Iran
  • Antiquities
  • Iran
Label
Studies in Ancient Persian History (RLE Iran A)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
V PERSIAN CHIVALRY AND ITS INFLUENCES
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • STUDIES IN ANCIENT PERSIAN HISTORY; Copyright; STUDIES IN ANCIENT PERSIAN HISTORY; Copyright; CONTENTS; INTRODUCTION; Objects of the book; Comments on Gibbon, Malcolm, and Rawlinson; On Browne's Literary History, and Richardson; Training of Arab and Persian writers in general, and Firdausi; Nature of questions discussed in the book; I; Brief abstract of ancient Persian history; Division of the book into sections, and their headings; Mahomedan chroniclers judged; Absence of patriotism in Mahomedan writers; Firdausi's summersault; Attitude of present-day Persia
  • Agitation of the eleventh centuryMirkhond's canons of historical criticism; Disqualifications of Arab writers; Of Moslem writers in general; Detailed analysis of the merits and demerits of Persian and Arabic histories; A concise estimate of the Sassanian regime and the national traits under it; Dire results of the union of Church and State; II GREEK AND LATIN AUTHORS; English, German, and French modes of writing Oriental History criticised; Contradictions among Greek writers; Greek sentiments towards Asiatics; De Gobineau on Herodotus; Design of Herodotus in writing his book
  • Greek accounts of the alleged Persian invasions scrutinised and disprovedRichardson on the two invasions; III CHARACTER AND CIVILISATION OF THE ANCIENT PERSSIANS COMPARED WITH THOSE OF OTHER NATIONS; The truth about Greek and Latin learning; H. Spencer on the Greeks and their character; The classicists and Mahaffy on Greek characteristics; Mahaffy and Merivale on Roman characteristics; Fascination of Persian character; Mahaffy on Persian character; Greeks and Persians contrasted; Remarks on the Hellenising of Asia contemplated by Alexander Grerat
  • Authoritative opinions on the Byzantine EmpireNoldeke's comparisons of Roman and Persian civilisations refuted; The influences which brought about the European Renaissance; Persian morals under the Sassanian Empire; Constitutents of the Sassanian culture; The parentage of Moslem sciences and Renaissance to be traced to the Sassanian learning; Futility of classical learning, and its retardation of progress in Europe; Moorish civilisation in Spain; Spencer's final judgment on the Eastern civilisations; IV THE HEROIC AGE OF PERSIA; Superficial views of Rawlinson and Browne
  • Facts disentangled by MalcolmThe genuine historical basis of the heroic period; Explanation of the gaps and defects in Persian traditions; Authenticity of Pehlavi records; Greek omission of pre-Achemenian dynasties of no consequence; Professor Sayce on modern research in its bearing on Greek treatment of Oriental history; The richness of Persian material for history; Superiority of Persian history to Greek; Spencer's principles applied to the interpretation of Persian legends; Gobineau's systematisation of legendary history; Uses and meaning of " tradition "
Control code
804664101
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (199 pages).
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780203833179
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)804664101
Label
Studies in Ancient Persian History (RLE Iran A)
Publication
Note
V PERSIAN CHIVALRY AND ITS INFLUENCES
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • STUDIES IN ANCIENT PERSIAN HISTORY; Copyright; STUDIES IN ANCIENT PERSIAN HISTORY; Copyright; CONTENTS; INTRODUCTION; Objects of the book; Comments on Gibbon, Malcolm, and Rawlinson; On Browne's Literary History, and Richardson; Training of Arab and Persian writers in general, and Firdausi; Nature of questions discussed in the book; I; Brief abstract of ancient Persian history; Division of the book into sections, and their headings; Mahomedan chroniclers judged; Absence of patriotism in Mahomedan writers; Firdausi's summersault; Attitude of present-day Persia
  • Agitation of the eleventh centuryMirkhond's canons of historical criticism; Disqualifications of Arab writers; Of Moslem writers in general; Detailed analysis of the merits and demerits of Persian and Arabic histories; A concise estimate of the Sassanian regime and the national traits under it; Dire results of the union of Church and State; II GREEK AND LATIN AUTHORS; English, German, and French modes of writing Oriental History criticised; Contradictions among Greek writers; Greek sentiments towards Asiatics; De Gobineau on Herodotus; Design of Herodotus in writing his book
  • Greek accounts of the alleged Persian invasions scrutinised and disprovedRichardson on the two invasions; III CHARACTER AND CIVILISATION OF THE ANCIENT PERSSIANS COMPARED WITH THOSE OF OTHER NATIONS; The truth about Greek and Latin learning; H. Spencer on the Greeks and their character; The classicists and Mahaffy on Greek characteristics; Mahaffy and Merivale on Roman characteristics; Fascination of Persian character; Mahaffy on Persian character; Greeks and Persians contrasted; Remarks on the Hellenising of Asia contemplated by Alexander Grerat
  • Authoritative opinions on the Byzantine EmpireNoldeke's comparisons of Roman and Persian civilisations refuted; The influences which brought about the European Renaissance; Persian morals under the Sassanian Empire; Constitutents of the Sassanian culture; The parentage of Moslem sciences and Renaissance to be traced to the Sassanian learning; Futility of classical learning, and its retardation of progress in Europe; Moorish civilisation in Spain; Spencer's final judgment on the Eastern civilisations; IV THE HEROIC AGE OF PERSIA; Superficial views of Rawlinson and Browne
  • Facts disentangled by MalcolmThe genuine historical basis of the heroic period; Explanation of the gaps and defects in Persian traditions; Authenticity of Pehlavi records; Greek omission of pre-Achemenian dynasties of no consequence; Professor Sayce on modern research in its bearing on Greek treatment of Oriental history; The richness of Persian material for history; Superiority of Persian history to Greek; Spencer's principles applied to the interpretation of Persian legends; Gobineau's systematisation of legendary history; Uses and meaning of " tradition "
Control code
804664101
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (199 pages).
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780203833179
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)804664101

Library Locations

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      37.955220 -91.772210
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