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The Resource Teaching what really happened : how to avoid the tyranny of textbooks and get students excited about doing history, James W. Loewen

Teaching what really happened : how to avoid the tyranny of textbooks and get students excited about doing history, James W. Loewen

Label
Teaching what really happened : how to avoid the tyranny of textbooks and get students excited about doing history
Title
Teaching what really happened
Title remainder
how to avoid the tyranny of textbooks and get students excited about doing history
Statement of responsibility
James W. Loewen
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Loewen, James W
Dewey number
973
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
E175.85
LC item number
.L65 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Multicultural education series
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • United States
  • United States
  • Historiography
  • Study skills
  • Textbooks
  • United States
Label
Teaching what really happened : how to avoid the tyranny of textbooks and get students excited about doing history, James W. Loewen
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction : history as weapon -- A lesson from Mississippi -- A lesson from Vermont -- Why history is important to students -- Why history is important to society -- 1. The tyranny of coverage: -- Forests, trees, and twigs -- Winnowing trees -- Deep thinking -- Relevance to the present -- Skills -- Getting the principal on board -- Coping with reasons to teach "as usual" -- You are not alone -- Brining students along -- 2. Expecting excellence: -- Student characteristics affect teacher expectations -- "Standardized" tests affect teacher expectations -- Statistical processes cause cultural bias in "standardized" tests -- Internalizing expectations -- Teachers can create their own expectations -- 3. Historiography: -- A tale of two eras -- The civil rights movement, cognitive dissonance, and historiography -- Studying bad history -- Other ways to teach historiography -- 4. Doing history: -- Doing history to critique history -- Writing a paper -- Bringing families in -- Local history -- Getting started -- Final product -- Using the product -- 5. Truth: -- Background of the problem -- Separating matters of fact from matters of opinion -- Five tests to assess credibility -- 6. How and when do people get here? -- A crash course on archeological issues -- Presentism -- Today's religions and yesterday's history -- Conclusions about presentism -- Chronological ethnocentrism -- Primitive to civilized -- Costs of chronological ethnocentrism -- 7. Why did Europe win? -- The important questions -- Looking around the world -- Explaining civilization -- Making the Earth round -- Why did Columbus win? -- The Columbian exchange -- Ideological results of Europe's victory -- Cultural diffusion and syncretism continue -- 8. The $24 myth: -- Deconstructing the $24 myth -- A more accurate story -- Functions of the fable -- Overt racism? -- Additional considerations -- 9. Slavery: -- Relevance to the present -- Hold a meta-conversation -- Slavery and racism -- Four key problems of slave life -- Additional problems in teaching the history of slavery -- 10. The Confederacy: -- Teachers vote -- Teaching against the State's Rights myth -- Critiquing textbooks -- Our Confederate landscape -- Genesis of the problem -- 11. The Nadir: -- Contemporary relevance -- Onset of the Nadir -- Historical causes of antiracist idealism -- Historical causes of the Nadir of race relations -- Students can reveal the Nadir themselves -- During the Nadir, whites became white -- End of the Nadir -- Implications for today -- Afterword : still more ways to teach history
Control code
MSTDDAPRINT1048660047
Dimensions
23 cm.
Edition
Second edition.
Extent
xvi, 272 pages
Isbn
9780807759486
Lccn
2018033738
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
Label
Teaching what really happened : how to avoid the tyranny of textbooks and get students excited about doing history, James W. Loewen
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction : history as weapon -- A lesson from Mississippi -- A lesson from Vermont -- Why history is important to students -- Why history is important to society -- 1. The tyranny of coverage: -- Forests, trees, and twigs -- Winnowing trees -- Deep thinking -- Relevance to the present -- Skills -- Getting the principal on board -- Coping with reasons to teach "as usual" -- You are not alone -- Brining students along -- 2. Expecting excellence: -- Student characteristics affect teacher expectations -- "Standardized" tests affect teacher expectations -- Statistical processes cause cultural bias in "standardized" tests -- Internalizing expectations -- Teachers can create their own expectations -- 3. Historiography: -- A tale of two eras -- The civil rights movement, cognitive dissonance, and historiography -- Studying bad history -- Other ways to teach historiography -- 4. Doing history: -- Doing history to critique history -- Writing a paper -- Bringing families in -- Local history -- Getting started -- Final product -- Using the product -- 5. Truth: -- Background of the problem -- Separating matters of fact from matters of opinion -- Five tests to assess credibility -- 6. How and when do people get here? -- A crash course on archeological issues -- Presentism -- Today's religions and yesterday's history -- Conclusions about presentism -- Chronological ethnocentrism -- Primitive to civilized -- Costs of chronological ethnocentrism -- 7. Why did Europe win? -- The important questions -- Looking around the world -- Explaining civilization -- Making the Earth round -- Why did Columbus win? -- The Columbian exchange -- Ideological results of Europe's victory -- Cultural diffusion and syncretism continue -- 8. The $24 myth: -- Deconstructing the $24 myth -- A more accurate story -- Functions of the fable -- Overt racism? -- Additional considerations -- 9. Slavery: -- Relevance to the present -- Hold a meta-conversation -- Slavery and racism -- Four key problems of slave life -- Additional problems in teaching the history of slavery -- 10. The Confederacy: -- Teachers vote -- Teaching against the State's Rights myth -- Critiquing textbooks -- Our Confederate landscape -- Genesis of the problem -- 11. The Nadir: -- Contemporary relevance -- Onset of the Nadir -- Historical causes of antiracist idealism -- Historical causes of the Nadir of race relations -- Students can reveal the Nadir themselves -- During the Nadir, whites became white -- End of the Nadir -- Implications for today -- Afterword : still more ways to teach history
Control code
MSTDDAPRINT1048660047
Dimensions
23 cm.
Edition
Second edition.
Extent
xvi, 272 pages
Isbn
9780807759486
Lccn
2018033738
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps

Library Locations

    • Curtis Laws Wilson LibraryBorrow it
      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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