Coverart for item
The Resource The emergence of the English native speaker : a chapter in nineteenth-century linguistic thought, Stephanie Hackert

The emergence of the English native speaker : a chapter in nineteenth-century linguistic thought, Stephanie Hackert

Label
The emergence of the English native speaker : a chapter in nineteenth-century linguistic thought
Title
The emergence of the English native speaker
Title remainder
a chapter in nineteenth-century linguistic thought
Statement of responsibility
Stephanie Hackert
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The volume reconstructs the coming-into-being of the English native speaker in the second half of the nineteenth century in order to probe into the origins of the problems surrounding the concept today. A corpus of texts which includes not only the classics of the nineteenth-century linguistic literature but also numerous lesser-known articles from periodical journals of the time is investigated by means of historical discourse analysis in order to retrace the production and reproduction of this particularly important linguistic ideology
Member of
Cataloging source
NLGGC
Dewey number
420.9034
Index
no index present
LC call number
PE1085
LC item number
.H33 2012
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Hackert, Stephanie
Series statement
Language and Social Processes LSP
Series volume
v. 4
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • Historical linguistics
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • Historical linguistics
  • English-speaking countries
  • Moedertaalsprekers
  • Engels
Label
The emergence of the English native speaker : a chapter in nineteenth-century linguistic thought, Stephanie Hackert
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Met lit. opg. en reg
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Acknowledgements; 1 Introduction; Part I: A discourse-historical approach to the English native speaker; 2 The native speaker in contemporary linguistics; 2.1 So what is the problem with the native speaker?; 2.2 Defining the native speaker; 2.3 The native speaker in the World Englishes context; 2.3.1 Modeling World Englishes; 2.3.2 The ownership question: Whose English is it?; 2.4 Approaches to the native speaker: Features or historical construct?; 2.5 The birth of the English native speaker; 3 Identities, ideologies, and discourse: Toward a theoretical and methodological framework
  • 3.1 Linguistic identities and ideologies3.2 Discourse as a scientific object; 3.3 Discourse as a linguistic object; 3.3.1 Linguistic approaches to discourse I: Historical discourse analysis; 3.3.2 Digression: Late-nineteenth century intertextuality and the notion of the discourse community; 3.3.3 Linguistic approaches to discourse II: Critical Discourse Analysis; 3.4 The corpus; 3.4.1 Socio- and linguistic-historical background; 3.4.2 Constitution of the corpus; 3.4.3 A note on quoted material; 4 The ideologies of Marsh (1859): A close reading; 4.1 The introduction
  • 4.2 Of native speakers, native languages, and native philology4.3 Names for English and its speakers; 4.4 Summary; Part II : "Good" English and the "best" speakers: The native speaker and standards of language, speech, and writing; 5 Defining and delimiting "English" and "standard English"; 5.1 The native speaker and the standard language in the World Englishes context; 5.2 Defining a language: Stability and staticity as theoretical and methodological necessities of nineteenth- and twentieth-century linguistics
  • 5.2.1 Nineteenth-century attempts at solving the problem of linguistic heterogeneity5.2.2 The "imagination" of standard English through the OED; 6 The question of standard spoken English and the dialects; 6.1 From written to spoken standards for English; 6.1.1 Standard spoken English: Where is it to be found?; 6.1.2 English = standard English; 6.1.3 Standard English = educated English; 6.1.4 Educated speakers are the "best" speakers; 6.1.5 Can we not define the standard linguistically?; 6.1.6 "Educated" = public-school educated; 6.1.7 Of "natural" educated speakers "to the language born."
  • 6.1.8 Educated English = a level of excellence which need not be homogenous in reality6.1.9 Colloquial English and the naturalness problem; 6.2 The standard and the dialects; 6.2.1 Whence the new interest in the dialects?; 6.2.2 The status of the dialects vis-à-vis the standard language; 6.2.3 The dialects' contribution to the historicization of the standard language: "Primitive" forms and "Anglo-Saxon" words; 6.2.4 Preservation of the dialects: "Antique curiosities" or actual means of communication?; 6.2.5 "Genuine" dialect and "authentic" speakers: The emergence of the NORM
Control code
824849580
Extent
1 online resource (text (x, 306 pages))
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781614511052
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)824849580
Label
The emergence of the English native speaker : a chapter in nineteenth-century linguistic thought, Stephanie Hackert
Publication
Bibliography note
Met lit. opg. en reg
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Acknowledgements; 1 Introduction; Part I: A discourse-historical approach to the English native speaker; 2 The native speaker in contemporary linguistics; 2.1 So what is the problem with the native speaker?; 2.2 Defining the native speaker; 2.3 The native speaker in the World Englishes context; 2.3.1 Modeling World Englishes; 2.3.2 The ownership question: Whose English is it?; 2.4 Approaches to the native speaker: Features or historical construct?; 2.5 The birth of the English native speaker; 3 Identities, ideologies, and discourse: Toward a theoretical and methodological framework
  • 3.1 Linguistic identities and ideologies3.2 Discourse as a scientific object; 3.3 Discourse as a linguistic object; 3.3.1 Linguistic approaches to discourse I: Historical discourse analysis; 3.3.2 Digression: Late-nineteenth century intertextuality and the notion of the discourse community; 3.3.3 Linguistic approaches to discourse II: Critical Discourse Analysis; 3.4 The corpus; 3.4.1 Socio- and linguistic-historical background; 3.4.2 Constitution of the corpus; 3.4.3 A note on quoted material; 4 The ideologies of Marsh (1859): A close reading; 4.1 The introduction
  • 4.2 Of native speakers, native languages, and native philology4.3 Names for English and its speakers; 4.4 Summary; Part II : "Good" English and the "best" speakers: The native speaker and standards of language, speech, and writing; 5 Defining and delimiting "English" and "standard English"; 5.1 The native speaker and the standard language in the World Englishes context; 5.2 Defining a language: Stability and staticity as theoretical and methodological necessities of nineteenth- and twentieth-century linguistics
  • 5.2.1 Nineteenth-century attempts at solving the problem of linguistic heterogeneity5.2.2 The "imagination" of standard English through the OED; 6 The question of standard spoken English and the dialects; 6.1 From written to spoken standards for English; 6.1.1 Standard spoken English: Where is it to be found?; 6.1.2 English = standard English; 6.1.3 Standard English = educated English; 6.1.4 Educated speakers are the "best" speakers; 6.1.5 Can we not define the standard linguistically?; 6.1.6 "Educated" = public-school educated; 6.1.7 Of "natural" educated speakers "to the language born."
  • 6.1.8 Educated English = a level of excellence which need not be homogenous in reality6.1.9 Colloquial English and the naturalness problem; 6.2 The standard and the dialects; 6.2.1 Whence the new interest in the dialects?; 6.2.2 The status of the dialects vis-à-vis the standard language; 6.2.3 The dialects' contribution to the historicization of the standard language: "Primitive" forms and "Anglo-Saxon" words; 6.2.4 Preservation of the dialects: "Antique curiosities" or actual means of communication?; 6.2.5 "Genuine" dialect and "authentic" speakers: The emergence of the NORM
Control code
824849580
Extent
1 online resource (text (x, 306 pages))
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781614511052
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)824849580

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