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The Resource The papers of Andrew Jackson, Sam B. Smith and Harriet Chappell Owsley, editors ; Robert V. Remini, consulting editor ; Sharon C. Macpherson, associate editor ; Linda D. Keeton, staff assistant

The papers of Andrew Jackson, Sam B. Smith and Harriet Chappell Owsley, editors ; Robert V. Remini, consulting editor ; Sharon C. Macpherson, associate editor ; Linda D. Keeton, staff assistant

Label
The papers of Andrew Jackson
Title
The papers of Andrew Jackson
Statement of responsibility
Sam B. Smith and Harriet Chappell Owsley, editors ; Robert V. Remini, consulting editor ; Sharon C. Macpherson, associate editor ; Linda D. Keeton, staff assistant
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • V. 6. This sixth volume of The Papers of Andrew Jackson documents the election on Andrew Jackson, the first westerner and the last veteran of the American Revolution, to the presidency. The four years of this volume chronicle the presidential campaign of 1828. Jackson, winner of the popular vote in 1824 but loser of the election, was once again the reluctant candidate, called into service by the voice of the voters. The campaign, one of the longest in American history, pitted Jackson against the incumbent John Quincy Adams; it was also one of the dirtiest campaigns in American history. The brunt of the mudslinging was aimed at Jackson, and it is covered in detail in this volume. Every aspect of the public and private life of the fifty-eight-year-old former major general in the United States Army came under scrutiny, and in both his opponents found him deficient. According to his detractors, he lacked the moral principles, the temperament, the education, and the family background requisite for a president of the United States. In sum, Jackson resembled the devil incarnate, to use his own words. The mudslinging left Jackson livid, anxious for retribution but constrained by the cause in which he was engaged. The presidential campaign of 1828, in the minds of Jackson and his supporters, was for the cause of truth and democracy against corrupt, self-seeking politicians, an aristocracy of power built upon bargains and dubious political alliances dedicated to its perpetuation in office. The four years covered in this volume were some of the most trying in Jackson s life, but the one event that hurt Jackson the most was the death of his wife. Until his dying day, Jackson contended that her death had been hastened by the slanders of his opponents in the campaign. As great as the loss was for him personally, Jackson nonetheless rejoiced in the results of the election for, in his eyes, the voice of the people had finally been heard. Liberty, not power, had triumphed. Reform was at hand, and retribution would surely follow. V. 7. With this seventh volume, The Papers of Andrew Jackson enters the heart of Jackson's career: his tumultuous two terms as president of the United States. The year 1829 began with Jackson fresh from a triumphant victory over incumbent John Quincy Adams in the 1828 campaign, yet mourning the sudden death of his beloved wife, Rachel. In January, having hired an overseer for his Hermitage plantation and arranged for Rachel's tomb, he left Tennessee for Washington. Jackson assumed the presidency with two objectives already fixed in mind: purging the federal bureaucracy of recreant officeholders and removing the southern Indian tribes westward beyond state authority. By year's end he had added two more: purchasing Texas and destroying the Bank of the United States. But meanwhile he found himself diverted, and nearly consumed, by the notorious Peggy Eaton affair--a burgeoning scandal which pitted the president, his Secretary of War John Eaton, and the latter's vivacious wife against the Washington guardians of feminine propriety. This first presidential volume reveals all these stories, and many more, in a depth never seen before. It presents full texts of more than four hundred documents, most printed for the first time. Gathered from a vast array of libraries, archives, and individual owners, they include Jackson's intimate exchanges with family and friends, private notes and musings, and formative drafts of public addresses. Administrative papers range from presidential pardons to military promotions to plans for discharging the public debt. They exhibit Jackson's daily conduct of the executive office in close and sometimes startling detail, and cast new light on such controversial mattersas Indian removal and political patronage. Included also are letters to the president from people in every corner of the country and every walk of life: Indian delegations presenting grievances, distraught mothers pleading help for wayward sons, aged veterans begging pensions, politicians offering advice and seeking jobs. Embracing a broad spectrum of actors and events, this volume offers an incomparable window not only into Jackson and his presidency, but into America itself in 1829
  • V. 8. This eighth volume of Andrew Jackson s papers presents more than five hundred documents, many appearing here for the first time, from a core year in Jackson s tumultuous presidency. They include Jackson s handwritten drafts of his presidential messages, private notes and memoranda, and correspondence with government officials, Army and Navy officers, friends and family, Indian leaders, foreign diplomats, and ordinary citizens throughout the country. In 1830 Jackson pursued his controversial Indian removal policy, concluding treaties to compel the Choctaws and Chickasaws west of theMississippi and refusing protection for the Cherokees against encroachments by Georgia. Jackson nurtured his opposition to the Bank of the United States and entered into an escalating confrontation with the Senate over presidential appointments to office. In April, Jackson pronounced his ban on nullification with the famous toast to Our Federal Union, and in May he began an explosive quarrel with Vice-President John C. Calhoun over the latter s conduct as secretary of war during Jackson s Seminole campaign of 1818. Also in May, Jackson delivered his first presidential veto, stopping federal funding for the Maysville Road and declaring opposition to Henry Clay s American System. In July, Jackson s refusal to use his pardoning power to save an Irish-born mail robber from the gallows provoked a near-riot in Philadelphia. By the end of the year, Jackson was preparing for his reelection campaign in 1832. Meanwhile the sex scandal surrounding Peggy Eaton, wife of the secretary of war, lurked throughout, dividing Jackson s cabinet, sundering his own family and household, and threatening to wreck the administration. Embracing all these stories and many more, this volume offers an incomparable window not only into Andrew Jackson and his presidency but into 1830s America itself. V. 9. This volume presents more than five hundred original documents, many newly discovered, from Andrew Jackson s third presidential year. They include Jackson s private memoranda, intimate family letters, and correspondence with government and military officers, diplomats, Indians, political friends and foes, and ordinary citizens throughout the country. In 1831 Jackson finally cleared his contentious Cabinet, reluctantly accepting the resignations of Martin Van Buren and John Eaton and demanding that the other members follow. But in the aftermath, animosities among them boiled over, as Eaton sought duels with outgoing secretaries Samuel Ingham and John Berrien. The affair ended with gangs of armed high-government officers stalking each other in the Washington streets, and with Ingham publicly accusing Jackson of countenancing a plot to assassinate him. Meanwhile, Jackson pursued his feud with Vice-President John C. Calhoun, whom he had come to view as the diabolical manipulator of all his enemies. Enlisting a favorite Supreme Court justice to gather evidence, Jackson crafted an exposition, intended for publication, that leveled nearly fantastic charges against Calhoun and others. Through all this, the business of government ploughed on. Jackson pursued his drive to remove the Cherokees and other Indians west of the Mississippi and to undercut tribal leaders who dared resist. To squelch sectional controversy, Jackson moved to retire the national debt and reduce the tariff, while reiterating his ban on nullification and his opposition to the Bank of the United States. Nat Turner s Virginia slave revolt in August drew a quick administration response. By year s end, the dust over the Cabinet implosion was settling, as Jackson prepared to stand for reelection against his old nemesis Henry Clay. Embracing all these stories and many more, this volume offers an incomparable window not only into Andrew Jackson and his presidency but into America itself in 1831. V. 10. This volume presents more than four hundred documents from Andrew Jackson s fourth presidential year. It includes private memoranda, intimate family letters, drafts of official messages, and correspondence with government and military officers, diplomats, Indians, political friends and foes, and ordinary citizens throughout the country. The year 1832 began with Jackson still pursuing his feud with Vice President John C. Calhoun, whom Jackson accused of secretly siding against him in the 1818 controversy over Jackson s Seminole campaign in Florida. The episode ended embarrassingly for Jackson when a key witness, called on to prove his charges, instead directly contradicted them. Indian removal remained a preoccupation for Jackson. The Choctaws began emigrating westward, the Creeks and Chickasaws signed but then immediately protested removal treaties, and the Cherokees won what proved to be an empty victory against removal in the Supreme Court. Illinois Indians mounted armed resistance in the Black Hawk War. In midsummer, a cholera epidemic swept the country, and Jackson was urged to proclaim a day of fasting andprayer. He refused, saying it would intermingle church and state. A bill to recharter the Bank of the United States passed Congress in July, and Jackson vetoed it with a ringing message that became the signature document of his presidency. In November, Jackson, with new running mate Martin Van Buren, won triumphant reelection over Henry Clay. But only days later, South Carolina nullified the federal tariff law and began preparing for armed resistance. Jackson answered with an official proclamation that disunion by armed force is treason. The year closed with Jackson immersed in plans to suppress nullification and destroy the Bank of the United States. Embracing all these stories and many more, this volume offers an incomparable window into Andrew Jackson, his presidency, and America itself in 1832. -- Publisher website and Amazon.com
Member of
Biography type
autobiography
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1767-1845
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Jackson, Andrew
Dewey number
973.5/6/092
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
E302
LC item number
.J35 1980
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1929-2003
  • 1901-1999
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Smith, Sam B.
  • Owsley, Harriet Chappell
  • Moser, Harold D
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Jackson, Andrew
  • United States
  • Presidents
  • Jackson, Andrew
  • Jackson, Andrew (Politiker)
  • BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
  • Politics and government
  • Presidents
  • United States
  • Briefsammlung
  • Nachlass
  • Quelle
  • USA
Label
The papers of Andrew Jackson, Sam B. Smith and Harriet Chappell Owsley, editors ; Robert V. Remini, consulting editor ; Sharon C. Macpherson, associate editor ; Linda D. Keeton, staff assistant
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Vol. 2 edited by Harold D. Moser and Sharon Macpherson
  • Vol. 5 edited by Harold D. Moser, David H. Roth, and George H. Hoemann
  • Vol. 8-9 edited by Daniel Feller, Thomas Coens, Laura-Eve Moss
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
V. 1. 1770-1803 -- v. 2. 1804-1813 -- v. 3. 1814-1815 -- v. 4. 1816-1820 -- v. 5. 1825-1828 -- v. 6. 1825-1828 -- v. 7. 1829. -- v. 8. 1830. -- v. 9. 1831 -- v. 10. 1832
Control code
MSTDDAPRINT05029597
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
volumes <1-10>
Isbn
9781621902676
Lccn
79015078
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
Label
The papers of Andrew Jackson, Sam B. Smith and Harriet Chappell Owsley, editors ; Robert V. Remini, consulting editor ; Sharon C. Macpherson, associate editor ; Linda D. Keeton, staff assistant
Publication
Note
  • Vol. 2 edited by Harold D. Moser and Sharon Macpherson
  • Vol. 5 edited by Harold D. Moser, David H. Roth, and George H. Hoemann
  • Vol. 8-9 edited by Daniel Feller, Thomas Coens, Laura-Eve Moss
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
V. 1. 1770-1803 -- v. 2. 1804-1813 -- v. 3. 1814-1815 -- v. 4. 1816-1820 -- v. 5. 1825-1828 -- v. 6. 1825-1828 -- v. 7. 1829. -- v. 8. 1830. -- v. 9. 1831 -- v. 10. 1832
Control code
MSTDDAPRINT05029597
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
volumes <1-10>
Isbn
9781621902676
Lccn
79015078
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations

Library Locations

    • Curtis Laws Wilson LibraryBorrow it
      400 West 14th Street, Rolla, MO, 65409, US
      37.955220 -91.772210
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