Coverart for item
The Resource We're not here to entertain : punk rock, Ronald Reagan, and the real culture war of 1980s America, Kevin Mattson

We're not here to entertain : punk rock, Ronald Reagan, and the real culture war of 1980s America, Kevin Mattson

Label
We're not here to entertain : punk rock, Ronald Reagan, and the real culture war of 1980s America
Title
We're not here to entertain
Title remainder
punk rock, Ronald Reagan, and the real culture war of 1980s America
Statement of responsibility
Kevin Mattson
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"After the blast, Kurt Cobain's body slumped. Next to his corpse lay a piece of paper with his last words. At the time the bullet seared his head, Cobain was a rock star, his grizzled face graced the covers of slick music industry magazines, his songs received mainstream radio play, his band Nirvana performed in huge arenas. But he had been thinking an awful lot about what he called the "punk rock world" that saved his life during his teen years and that he had subsequently abandoned for stardom. He first encountered this world in the summer of 1983, at a free show the Melvins held in a Thriftway parking lot. After hearing the guttural sounds and watching kids dance by slamming against one another, he ran home and wrote in his journal: "This was what I was looking for," underlined twice. As he dove into this world, he recognized its blistering music played in odd venues, but also a wider array of creativity, like self-made zines, poetry, fiction, movies, artwork on flyers and record jackets, and even politics. This too: how all of these things opened up spaces for ideas and arguments. Now in his suicide note he reflected on his "punk rock 101 courses," where he learned "ethics involved with independence and the embracement of your community."2 There are people who can recount where they were when Cobain's suicide became news. I was in Ithaca, NY, finishing up my dissertation... but my mind immediately hurled backwards to growing up in Washington, D.C.'s "metropolitan area" (euphemism for suburban sprawl). I started to remember the first time I entered this "punk rock world." Around a year or two before Cobain went to the Thriftway parking lot, I opened the doors of the Chancery, a small club in Washington, D.C., and witnessed a tiny little stage, maybe a foot and a half off the ground. Suddenly, a small kid about my age (fifteen), his hair bleached into a shade of white that glowed in the lights, jumped up. I remember it being brighter than expected (unlike my earlier, wee-boy experiences in darkened, cavernous arenas where bands like Kiss or Cheap Trick would play to me and thousands of stoned audience members). This kid with the blond hair might have said something, I don't remember, what I recall is that his band broke into the fastest, most vicious sounding music I had ever heard. Suddenly bodies started flying through the air, young men (mostly) propelling themselves off the ground into the space between one another, flailing their arms, skin smacking skin. Control was lost, for when a body moved in one direction, another body collided into its path. When someone fell over, another would pick him up. The bodies got pushed onto the stage, making it hard to differentiate performer from audience member. At one moment it appeared the singer had been tackled by a clump of kids, and he seemed to smile. Sometimes, I could even make out what the fifteen-year old was shouting, especially, "I'm going to make their society bleed!" Overwhelmed, I rushed outside to clear my head"--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
NhCcYBP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1966-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mattson, Kevin
Dewey number
306.4/84260973
Index
index present
LC call number
ML3534.3
LC item number
.M385 2020
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
ProQuest (Firm)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • Punk rock music
  • Rock music
Label
We're not here to entertain : punk rock, Ronald Reagan, and the real culture war of 1980s America, Kevin Mattson
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Preface: From Memory . . . to History -- Prelude (1979-1980) : When Punk Broke . . . and Opened -- 1 Teeny Punks : Pioneer Your Own Culture! (1980-1981) -- 2 It Can and Will Happen Everywhere (1982-1983) -- 3 It's 1984! (1984) -- 4 Marching toward the "Alternative" (1985-?) -- Epilogue: Punk Breaks Again
Control code
MSTDDA6187424
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780190908256
Lccn
2019044700
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
Label
We're not here to entertain : punk rock, Ronald Reagan, and the real culture war of 1980s America, Kevin Mattson
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Preface: From Memory . . . to History -- Prelude (1979-1980) : When Punk Broke . . . and Opened -- 1 Teeny Punks : Pioneer Your Own Culture! (1980-1981) -- 2 It Can and Will Happen Everywhere (1982-1983) -- 3 It's 1984! (1984) -- 4 Marching toward the "Alternative" (1985-?) -- Epilogue: Punk Breaks Again
Control code
MSTDDA6187424
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780190908256
Lccn
2019044700
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote

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